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No. 681.-Col. Richard W. Turner, Nineteenth Louisiana Infantry, of operations

May 14-28. No. 682.—Capt. Robert L. Keen, Twentieth Louisiana Infantry, of operations May

26-29. No. 683.—Lieut. Gen. Leonidas Polk, C.S. Arniy, commanding Army of Mississippi,

of operations May 13–31. No. 684.—Maj. Gen. William W. Loring, C.S. Army, commanding Army of Missis

sippi, of operations June 27. No. 685.- Lieut. Gen. Alexander P. Stewart, C. S. Army, commanding corps (for

merly Polk's), of operations July 18-September 29. No. 686.--Capt. Charles F. Vanderford, Chief Ordnance Officer, Army of Mississippi,

of guns engaged, &c., May 13-June 20. No. 687.—Maj. Gen. William W. Loring, C. S. Army, commanding division, of oper

ations May 10–31 and July 20. No. 688.—Brig. Gen. Winfield S. Featherston, C. S. Army, commanding Loring's

division, of operations June 27. No. 689.-Brig. Gen. Winfield S. Featherston, C. S. Army, commanding brigade, of

operations July 20. No. 690.- Maj. James M. Stigler, First Mississippi Battalion Sharpshooters, of oper

ations July 20. No. 691.—Lieut. Col. Samuel M. Dyer, Third Mississippi Infantry, of operations

July 20. No. 692.—Maj. Martin A. Оatis, Twenty-second Mississippi Infantry, of operations No. 709. -Brig. Gen. William A. Quarles, C. S. Army, conimanding brigade, of

July 20. No. 693.-Capt. Thomas J. Pulliam, Thirty-first Mississippi Infantry, of operations

July 20. No. 694.-Capt. Moses Jackson, Thirty-third Mississippi Infantry, of operations

July 20. No. 695.-Capt. Charles A. Huddleston, Fortieth Mississippi Infantry, of operations

July 20. No. 696.-Brig. Gen. John Adams, C. S. Army, commanding brigade, of operations

July 19. No. 697.-Brig. Gen. Thomas M. Scott, C. S. Army, commanding brigade, of oper

ations July 20. No. 698.-Col. Samuel S. Ives, Thirty-fifth Alabama Infantry, commanding Twenty

seventh, Thirty-fifth, and Forty-ninth Alabama Infantry, of operations

July 20. No. 699.-Col. John Snodgrass, Fifty-fifth Alabama Infantry, of operations July 20. No. 700.--Capt. Augustus L. Milligan, Fifty-seventh Alabama Infantry, of operations

July 20. No. 701.—Col. Noel L. Nelson, Twelfth Louisiana Infantry, of operations July 20. No. 702.—Maj. Gen. Samuel G. French, C. S. Army, commanding division, of oper

ations May 16-31, June 27, and July 17-September 6. No. 703.-Brig. Gen. William H. Young, C. S. Army, commanding Ector's brigade,

of operations July 17-September 4. No. 704.-Col. William H. Young, Ninth Texas Infantry, of operations June 27. No. 705.—Brig. Gen. Francis M. Cockrell, C. S. Army, commanding brigade, of

operations June 27 and July 17-September 7. No. 706.—Brig. Gen. Claudius W. Sears, C. S. Army, commanding brigade, of oper

ations August 4–27. No. 707.-Col. William H. Clark, Forty-sixth Mississippi Infantry, of operations

August 2–5. No. 708.—Maj. Gen. Edward C. Walthall, C. S. Army, commanding division, of

operations June 27 and July 18-September 3.

operations June 27 and July 20 and 28. No. 710.—Maj. Samuel L. Knox, First Alabama Infantry, of operations June 27. No. 711.-Brig. Gen. Daniel H. Reynolds, C. S. Army, commanding brigade, of

operations June 27, July 14-20 and 28. No. 712.—Col. Edward A. O'Neal, Twenty-sixth Alabama Infantry, commanding

Cantey's brigade, of operations June 27 and July 20 and 28. No. 713.—Maj. Gen. Joseph Wheeler, C. S. Army, commanding Cavalry Corps, of

operations May 6–31 and July 17-October 9. No. 714.-Col. D. T. Blakey, First Alabama Cavalry, Allen's brigade, of operations

August 31. No. 715.—Brig. Gen. Lawrence S. Ross, C. S. Army, commanding cavalry brigade

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(Army of Mississippi), of operations May 17 and July 28–30. No. 716.-Brig. Gen. Phillip D. Roddey, C. S. Army, of operations May 27–29. No. 717.—Col. Josiah Patterson, Fifth Alabama Cavalry, commanding brigade, of

operations May 26-29. No. 718.—Capt. Thomas J. Key, Arkansas Artillery, commanding Hotchkiss' artil

lery battalion, of operations July 22. No. 719.—Lieut. Richard L. Watkins, Lookout (Tennessee) Artillery, of operations

July 20. No. 720.-Maj. George S. Storrs, C. S. Artillery, commanding artillery battalion, of

operations June 27. No. 721.--Lieut. Charles W. Lovelace, Selden's (Alabama) battery, of operations

July 20. No. 722.—Maj. Gen. Gustavus W. Smi:h, C. S. Army, commanding Georgia militia,

of operations Jupe 1-September 15. No. 723.—Maj. Gen. Howell Cobb, C. S. Army, of operations July 30 and 31 (Stone

man's raid). No. 724.-Lieut. John A. Vaughan, Eighth Confederate Cavalry, commanding

scouts, of operations July 27-31 (McCook's raid). No. 725.-Capt. Thomas H. Francis, Fourth Tennessee Infantry, of affairs at

Auburn, Ala., July 18-Septeniber 15. No. 726.-Maj. W. T. Walthall, of operations July 13–16 (Rousseau's raid).' No. 727.-Maj. John C. Burch, Assistant Adjutant-General, C. S. Army, of oper

ations July 13–16 (Rousseau's raid). No. 728.-Journal of operations of the Army of Tennessee May 14-June 4. No. 729.- Findings of the Court of Inquiry upon the loss of Confederate stores at

Atlanta. No. 730.—Maj. William Clare, Assistant Inspector-General, upon the removal of cit

izens from Atlanta. No. 731.—Brig. Gen. Gideon J. Pillow, C.S. Army, of operations June 24. No. 732.-Col. Charles G. Armistead, Twelfth Mississippi Cavalry, com mmanding

brigade, of operations June 24. No. 733.—Col. Charles P. Ball, Eighth Alabama Cavalry, of operations June 24. No. 734.—Lieut. Col. Philip B. Spence, Twelfth Mississippi Cavalry, of operations,

June 24. No. 735.

Capt. William V. Harrell, Lewis' (Alabama) battalion, of operations

June 24. No. 736.—Col. James J. Neely, Fourteenth Tennessee Cavalry, commanding brigade,

of operations June 24. No. 737.-Resolution of thanks to officers and soldiers in the Confederate service

from the State of Missouri.

No. 437.

Reports of Maj. Geni James B. McPherson, U. S. Army, com

manding Army of the Tennessee, of operations May 9, 10, 27, and 28, and July 4, 5, 18, and 21.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

In the Field, about Fire Miles from Resaca, at Intersection of Cross-Roads, May 9, 1861–12.30 p. m. GENERAL: We met one brigade of rebel cavalry shortly after we emerged from the gap this morning; drove them back after a slight skirmish, Dodge's advance must be within two miles of Resaca by this time. The cavalry which we met here was part of Wheeler's. Prisoners say they left Dalton at 10 p. m. last night and expected to get possession of the gap. We were a little too quick for them. I cannot find out whether there is any considerable force of infantry at Resaca or not. Will know soon. Few houses along the road and no one at home, except women and children. Country densely wooded. Is impossible to communicate with General Hooker by signals, owing to the rough, impracticable nature of the country and the dense foliage. I propose to cut the railroad, if possible, and then fall back and take a strong position near the gorge on this [side] of the mountain and await your orders. I wrote to General Hooker to control the road across the mountain from Dalton, about six miles north of Snake Creek Gap. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. MCPHERSON.

Major-General, Commanding. Maj. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi.

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HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Camp at Sugar Vailey, May 9, 1864-10.30 p. m. GENERAL : General Dodge's command moved up and skirmished with the enemy at Resaca this afternoon. While that was going on one company of mounted infantry, Lieutenant-Colonel Phillips' regiment, succeeded in reaching the railroad near Tilton Station, but was forced to leave without damaging the track. They tore down a small portion of the telegraph wire. The enemy have a strong position at Resaca naturally, and, as far as we could see, have it pretty well fortified. They displayed considerable force, and opened on us with artillery. After skirmishing till nearly dark, and finding that I could not succeed in cutting the railroad before dark, or getting to it, I decided to withdraw the command and take up a position for the night between Sugar Valley and the entrance to the gap for the following reasons:

First. Between this point and Resaca there are a half dozen good roads leading north toward Dalton down which a column of the enemy could march, making our advanced position a very exposed

Second. General Dodge's men are all out of provisions, and some regiments have had nothing to-day. His wagon train is between

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here and Villanow, and possibly some of them are coming through the gap now, but they could not have reached him near Resaca; besides, I did not wish to block up the road with a train. narrow, and the country on either side is heavily wooded. I had no cavalry except Phillips' mounted men to feel out on the flanks. If I could have had a division of good cavalry I could have broken the railroad at some point. I shall be compelled to rest my men to-morrow forenoon, at least, to enable them to draw provisions. We have lost some 6 men killed and 30-odd wounded, but have inflicted a greater amount of damage to the enemy, and captured about 25 prisoners. General Kilpatrick is very anxious to make the attempt to cut the railroad. General Garrard is in La Fayette tonight; says his horses are very much fatigued and short of forage; desires to remain there until his forage train comes down from Chattanooga. When I move forward again I would like a division of Hooker's command to hold the entrance to the gap and the roads at Sugar Valley, thereby enabling me to move forward with my entire command, except train guards. The news from Grant is glorious. Sincerely, yours,

JAS. B. MCPHERSON,

Major-General, Commanding. Maj. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi.

66

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Camp in Sugar Creek Valley, May 10, 1861–5 p. m. GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatches of 10[.30) a. m. to-day.* Brigadier-General Williams has reported his division at the west end of the gap, and I have directed him to leave one brigade there to guard the trains, and to bring the other two through to this side, posting one regiment on the crest of the mountain near the letter “M,” on the northeast side of the mountain. Brigadier-General Kilpatrick's cavalry is just arriving here, and Garrard will be in Villanow to-night. Early this morning I sent out my engineer officers and selected a line which I think a good one, and have been fortifying it all day. The work has not progressed as satisfactorily as I could have wished, for want of intrenching tools in sufficient quantity, though we get along very well. If the enemy attack me, you may rest assured we will give him the best fight we can and he will have to come in strong force to dis

We have been skirmishing more or less all day win rebel cavalry, and they have a line of vedettes extending all around us except on the west, watching our movements and evidently to make out our force. From some of the elevated points they can obtain a pretty good view. Their skirmish line, a very light one, easily driven back, and composed of cavalry, is about seven miles long. From what you say of the position at Buzzard Roost I think it is the place to attack them, and by throwing in here a large force we would have the chances of a decided victory on our side. I feel satisfied if you could see the position of things here you would be of

*See Part IV, 2 R R-VOL XXXVIII, PT III

turb us.

the same opinion. The road through Snake Creek Gap is good and about six miles long. After getting through the country is undulating and generally densely timbered. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. MCPHERSON,

Major-General, Commanding. Maj. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi.

HER

IN THE FIELD,

Dallas, Ga., May 27, 1864-4 p. m. We have forced the enemy back to his breast-works throughout nearly the whole extent of his lines and find him occupying a strong position extending apparently from the north Marietta, or New Hope Church, road, to across the Villa Rica road.

Our lines are up within close musket-range in many places, and the enemy appear to be massing on our right. I cannot well work toward the left ; certainly not until I get trains and everything out of the way, for as soon as we uncover this flank (the right), the enemy will be on it. Vory respectfully, your obedient servant,

JAS. B. MCPHERSON,

Major-General, Commanding. Maj. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi.

DALLAS, GA., May 28, 1864—6.25 p. m. The enemy attacked us in force at 4.45 p. m. along the whole extent of the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Corps, and was handsomely repulsed, with heavy loss on his side and considerable on ours. We are now bringing in prisoners and wounded. Unless an imperative necessity demands it, I do not see how I can move to-night; besides, the effect on our men will be bad.

JAS. B. McPHERSON,

Major-General, Commanding. Maj. Gen. W. T. SHERMAN,

Commanding Military Division of the Mississippi.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT AND ARMY OF THE TENNESSEE,

Near Ruff's Mill, Ga., July 4, 1864–8.45 p. m. GENERAL: In pursuance of your instructions at daybreak this morning, I directed Major-General Dodge to take his entire command and push across Nickajack Creek at Ruff's Mill, General Blair to send two regiments and a section of artillery, supported by Stoneman's cavalry, from Widow Mitchell's down to Nickajack, near Turner's Ferry. Dodge moved across and ran against Stevenson's division, and as he developed his lines captured a few prisoners from each division of Hood's corps. I sent over Morgan L. Smith's division, and General Schofield sent in a brigade on Dodge's left to try and communicate with Hooker. As soon as the troops were over and in position, I directed Dodge to strengthen his skirmish line, so as to make it almost equivalent to a line of battle, especially over rough ground, and to assault the enemy's rifle-pits. The order was gallantly executed, the works taken, and some 50 prisoners captured; our loss not heavy; Colonel Noyes, Thirty-ninth

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