Prevent, Repent, Reform, Revenge: A Study in Adolescent Moral Development

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1995 - Psychology - 224 pages


Prevent, Repent, Reform, Revenge is a study of the aims that people intend to achieve by the sanctions and treatments they recommend for wrongdoers. The book is designed to answer two main questions: What kind of analytical scheme can profitably reveal the nature of people's reasoning about the aims of sanctions they propose for perpetrators of crimes and misdeeds? In the aims that people express what changes in overt moral reasoning patterns appear between later childhood and the early adult years? The authors conducted interviews with 136 youths between the ages of 9 and 21 to find out what sanctions and aims they felt were appropriate in three cases of wrongdoing. The resulting information provides an important insight into adolescent moral development.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

The Purpose of the Study
1
PREVIEWING KEY TERMS
2
PREVIEWING INTERVIEWS
7
CONCLUSION
10
A Framework for Interpreting Aims
13
1 Types of Aims and 2 Types of Sanctions
15
CONCLUSION
22
SanctionAim Relationships
23
Overt Reasoning Styles
121
REASONING PROCESS
122
SPECIFICITY OF RECOMMENDATIONS
123
INTERRATER RELIABILITY
124
CONCLUSION
129
Conceptions of God and the Sanctity of Life
131
DIVINE INTERVENTION IN HUMAN AFFAIRS
132
THE DEATH PENALTY CONDITIONS THAT DETERMINE ITS PROPER USE
140

A SCHEME FOR ANALYZING CAUSAL RELATIONSHIPS
24
ALTERNATIVE PATTERNS OF CAUSAL RELATIONS
25
CONCLUSION
31
1 The Nature of Reality and 2 Moral Value Commitments
33
MORAL VALUE COMMITMENTS
36
CONCLUSION
37
Overt Cognitive Sequences and Reasoning Styles
39
OVERT REASONING STYLES
42
CONCLUSION
45
Developmental Indicators
47
DIFFERENTIATION AND INTERDEPENDENCE
53
FANCIFUL VERSUS REALISTIC
56
DEGREE OF REBELLIOUSNESS
57
CONCLUSION
58
Ways of Reasoning About Aims From Child to Adult
59
The Nature of the Interviews
61
CONCLUSION
67
Proposed Sanctions and Aims
69
TYPES OF INTENDED AIMS
84
INTERPRETATIONS
92
CONCLUSION
99
Linking Sanctions and Aims
103
INTERVIEW RESULTS IN TERMS OF THE MODELS
105
CONSENSUS VERSUS INDIVIDUALITY
108
CONCLUSION
118
CONCLUSION
151
12 Views of Imprisonment
153
AGE AND GENDER COMPARISONS
164
CONCLUSION
170
Empathy and Sympathy
171
EMPATHY AND SYMPATHY DEFINED
172
COMPARISONS OF EMPATHIC REACTIONS
173
COMPARISONS OF SYMPATHETIC REACTIONS
177
CONCLUSION
180
Drugs and the Law
183
A VARIETY OF OPINIONS
184
ATTITUDES BY AGE AND GENDER
189
ADOLESCENT REBELLIOUSNESS
192
CONCLUSION
194
15 Views of Retribution
195
AGE AND GENDER COMPARISONS
199
CONCLUSION
201
Lessons Learned
203
EXPECTATIONS
204
ENLIGHTENMENT
206
UNFINISHED BUSINESS
208
References
209
The Interview Guidesheet
213
Index
219
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 2 - A crime or public offense is an act committed or omitted in violation of a law forbidding or commanding it, and to which is annexed, upon conviction, either of the following punishments: 1. Death; 2. Imprisonment; 3. Fine: 4. Removal from office; or, 5. Disqualification to hold and enjoy any office of honor, trust, or profit in this state.
Page 4 - ... shall sing The sweetness, mercy, majesty, And glories of my king; 20 When I shall voice aloud how good He is, how great should be, Enlarged winds that curl the flood Know no such liberty. Stone walls do not a prison make, 25 Nor iron bars a cage: Minds innocent and quiet take That for an hermitage. If I have freedom in my love, And in my soul am free, 30 Angels alone, that soar above, Enjoy such liberty.
Page 48 - ... justice can only come into being by free consent., Adult authority even if it acts in conformity with justice, has therefore the effect of weakening what constitutes the essence of justice. Hence those reactions which we observed among the smaller children, who confused what was just with what was law, law being whatever is prescribed by adult authority. Justice is identified with formulated rules — as indeed it is in the opinion of a great many adults, of all, namely, who have not succeeded...
Page 3 - Punishment in a legal sense is any pain, penalty, suffering, or confinement inflicted upon a person by the authority of the law, and the judgment and sentence of a court for some crime or offense committed by him or for bis omis«ion of a duty enjoined by law.
Page 5 - The Washington Supreme Court reasoned that "sometimes punishment is treatment" and upheld the legislature's conclusion that "accountability for criminal behavior, the prior criminal activity and punishment commensurate with age, crime and criminal history does as much to rehabilitate, correct and direct an errant youth as does the prior philosophy of focusing upon the particular characteristics of the individual juvenile
Page 2 - Dictionary defines crime as : "an action or an instance of negligence that is deemed injurious to the public welfare or morals or to the interests of the state and that is legally prohibited.
Page 49 - rational reconstruction of the ontogenesis of justice reasoning" and not, as people have often assumed, a complete depiction of moral development. I have always tried to be clear that my states are stages of justice reasoning, not of emotions, aspirations, or action. Our data base has been a set of hypothetical dilemmas posing conflicts between the rights or claims of different persons in dilemma situations. (Kohlberg, 1984, p. 224) Kohlberg postulated six stages in the development of moral reasoning...
Page 3 - Only remember that, in my creed, waste of public money is like the Sin against the Holy Ghost. At this point they have just sent me your press telegram of yesterday. It startles me that even hard Tchinovniks like your and your should so far forget that they are the servants and agents of Parliament in a free country, and should dream that a SS could live one hour after the assembling of Parliament...
Page 55 - We assume that organisms are naturally directed towards a series of transformations — reflecting a tendency to move from a state of relative globality and undifferentiatedness towards states of increasing differentiation and hierarchic integration.
Page 50 - social institutions, rules, or laws are evaluated by reference to their long-term consequences for the welfare of each person or group in the society" (Kohlberg, 1984, p. 634). Stage 6: Morality of Universalizable, Reversible, and Prescriptive General Ethical Principles. Kohlberg describes this stage as the moral point of view that "all human beings should take toward one another as free and equal autonomous persons

About the author (1995)

Ann C. Diver-Stamnes is an Assistant Professor in the Teacher Preparation Program at Humboldt State University in Arcata, California. She has published in the areas of poverty and its effects on adolescents, adolescent development, urban education, multicultural education, peer counseling and moral development.

R. Murray Thomas is professor emeritus at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Bibliographic information