The Theory of Our National Existence: As Shown by the Action of the Government of the United States Since 1861

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Little, Brown, 1881 - Constitutional law - 550 pages
 

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Page 479 - It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us, that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to the cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion...
Page 266 - I believe that it is not only possible, but in fact easier, to do this without deciding or even considering whether these States have ever been out of the Union, than with it. Finding themselves safely at home, it would be utterly immaterial whether they had ever been abroad.
Page 354 - An Act to amend an Act approved May thirty-one, eighteen hundred and seventy, entitled "An Act to enforce the Rights of Citizens of the United States to vote in the several States of this Union, and for other Purposes.
Page 138 - The states have their status in the Union, and they have no other legal status. If they break from this, they can only do so against law and by revolution.
Page 9 - It is difficult to convey the idea of indissoluble unity more clearly than by these words.
Page 10 - Not only, therefore, can there be no loss of separate and independent autonomy to the States, through their union under the Constitution, but it may be not unreasonably said that the preservation of the States, and the maintenance of their governments, are as much within the design and care of the Constitution as the preservation of the Union and the maintenance of the National government. The Constitution, in all its provisions, looks to an indestructible Union, composed of indestructible States.
Page 33 - President shall have power to grant reprieves and pardons for offences against the United States, except in cases of impeachment ; and whereas, a rebellion now exists, whereby the loyal State Governments of several States have for a long time been subverted...
Page 373 - It can act only through its officers and agents, and they must act within the States. If, when thus acting, and within the scope of their authority, those officers can be arrested and brought to trial in a State court, for an alleged...
Page 438 - The separate independence and individual sovereignty of the several states were never thought of by the enlightened band of patriots who framed this Declaration...
Page 192 - Now, therefore, I ABRAHAM LINCOLN, President of the United States, by virtue of the power in me vested as Commander-inChief of the Army and Navy of the United States in time of actual armed rebellion against the authority and Government of the United States, and as a fit and necessary war measure for suppressing said rebellion, do, on this...

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