Transactions of the American Horticultural Society, Volume 1

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Page 191 - And there's never a leaf nor a blade too mean To be some happy creature's palace; The little bird sits at his door in the sun, Atilt like a blossom among the leaves, And lets his illumined being o'errun With the deluge of summer it receives...
Page 188 - Sweet bird ! thy bower is ever green, Thy sky is ever clear ; Thou hast no sorrow in thy song, No winter in thy year...
Page 253 - Gul in her bloom ; Where the citron and olive are fairest of fruit, And the voice of the nightingale never is mute ; Where the tints of the earth, and the hues of the sky, In colour though varied, in beauty may vie...
Page 185 - said the grandmother ; " have you not heard, My poor, bad boy ! of the fiery pit, And how, drop by drop, this merciful bird Carries the water that quenches it ? " He brings cool dew in his little bill, And lets it fall on the souls of sin : You can see the mark on his red breast still Of fires that scorch as he drops it in.
Page 191 - The little bird sits at his door in the sun, Atilt like a blossom among the leaves, And lets his illumined being o'errun With the deluge of summer it receives; His mate feels the eggs beneath her wings, And the heart in her dumb breast flutters and sings; He sings to the wide world, and she to her nest, — In the nice ear of Nature which song is the best?
Page 104 - As it will be impossible for me to attend the meeting of the Society, to be held on Monday next, in memory of the late President, Mr.
Page 185 - For many years it has been one of my constant regrets that no schoolmaster of mine had a knowledge of natural history, so far, at least, as to have taught me the grasses that grow by the wayside, and the little winged and wingless neighbors that are continually meeting me, with a salutation which I cannot answer, as things are...
Page 184 - I heard a robin in the distance, the first I had heard for many a thousand years, methought, whose note I shall not forget for many a thousand more — the same sweet and powerful song as of yore.
Page 108 - Thou crownest the year with thy goodness ; and thy paths drop fatness. They drop upon the pastures of the wilderness : and the little hills rejoice on every side. The pastures are clothed with flocks ; the valleys also are covered over with corn ; they shout for joy, they also sing.
Page xii - This constitution may be amended by a two-thirds vote of the members present at any regular meeting.

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