The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Political Thought, Volume 1

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 31, 2006 - History - 919 pages
This major work of academic reference provides a comprehensive overview of the development of western political thought during the European enlightenment. Written by a distinguished team of international contributors, this Cambridge History is the latest in a sequence of volumes that is now firmly established as the principal reference source for the history of political thought. Every major theme in eighteenth-century political thought is covered in a series of essays at once scholarly and accessible, and the essays are complemented by extensive guides for further reading, and brief biographical notes of the major characters in the text, including Rousseau, Montesquieu and David Hume. Of interest and relevance to students and scholars of politics and history at all levels from beginning undergraduate upwards, this volume chronicles one of the most exciting and rewarding of all periods in the development of western thinking about politics, man (and increasingly woman), and society.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
The spirit of nations
9
The English system of liberty
40
Scepticism priestcraft and toleration
79
Piety and politics in the century of lights
110
Gallicanism and Jansenism in France I
119
The new light of reason
147
Encyclopedias and the diffusion of knowledge
172
Utilitarianism and the reform of the criminal law
547
FREDE Rick Rose N 1 Liberty and the criminal law
548
Crime and punishment in Beccaria
551
218
557
The debate over the death penalty
563
Transportation and imprisonment
566
Enlightenment and reform
568
Republicanism and popular sovereignty
573

Optimism progress and philosophical history
195
wol FGANG Pross
218
9
251
JAMES MooRE
291
David LIE b ERMAN
317
Commerce luxury and political economy
379
T J Ho CHSTRAS
419
w i
443
Babeuf
465
Needs and society
471
Property and the progress of the arts and sciences
475
The Gracchi and their legacy
480
A modern agrarian
488
Conclusion
492
The promotion of public happiness
495
Philosophical kingship and enlightened despotism
497
Frederick II Catherine II Joseph II
504
The idea of despotism 5 II
511
The idea of the enlightened despot
514
Conclusion
522
Cameralism and the sciences of the state
525
Oeconomy and the Hauswaterliteratur
530
Justi
537
Sonnenfels
542
Mably
577
Diderot
579
Venice and Geneva
583
Kant
587
Fichte
592
Humboldt
596
The American Revolution
601
Political languages of the French Revolution
626
British radicalism and the antiJacobins
660
31
671
Ideology and the origins of social science
688
Biographies
711
34
723
40
733
47
768
Bibliography
787
50
832
54
842
223
901
379
905
I
907
443
911
340
914
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About the author (2006)

Mark Goldie is a University Senior Lecturer in History and a Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge.

Mark Goldie is a University Senior Lecturer in History and a Fellow of Churchill College, Cambridge.

Robert Wokler (1942-2006) taught for many years at the University of Manchester, and subsequently taught at Yale University, Connecticut.

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