The Negro: The Southerner's Problem

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C. Scribner's Sons, 1904 - African Americans - 316 pages
 

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Page 131 - I barely suggest for your private consideration, whether some of the colored people may not be let in — as, for instance, the very intelligent, and especially those who have fought gallantly in our ranks. They would probably help, in some trying time to come, to keep the jewel of liberty within the family of freedom.
Page 130 - I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races — that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races...
Page 238 - Congress, banishing all feelings of mere passion or resentment, will recollect only its duty to the whole country; that this war is not waged upon our part in any spirit of oppression, nor for any purpose of conquest or subjugation, nor purpose of overthrowing or interfering with the rights or established institutions of those States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and to preserve the Union, with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired;...
Page 237 - I have no purpose, directly or indirectly, to interfere with the institution of slavery in the States where it exists. I believe I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no inclination to do so.
Page 237 - States, but to defend and maintain the supremacy of the Constitution and all laws made in pursuance thereof and to preserve the Union, with all the dignity, equality, and rights of the several States unimpaired; that as soon as these objects are accomplished the war ought to cease.
Page 143 - States; or, Second. A son of any such person; or, Third. A person, who owns property, upon which, for the year...
Page 143 - Mississippi constitution and laws impose the requirements that an applicant must be able to read and write any section of the State constitution and give a "reasonable interpretation...
Page 237 - Do the people of the South really entertain fears that a Republican administration would directly or indirectly interfere with the slaves or with them about the slaves? If they do I wish to assure you, as once a friend, and still, I hope, not an enemy, that there is no cause for such fears. The South would be in no more danger in this respect than it was in the days of Washington.
Page 243 - State rights, or the right of a State to secede from the Union — they regard as having been settled forever by the highest tribunal — arms — that man can resort to.

About the author (1904)

Thomas Nelson Page was born on April 23, 1853 at Oakland, the family plantation in Hanover County, Virginia. He attended Washington College (now Washington and Lee) but left before he completed his degree. He later attended the University of Pennsylvania as a law student for a year and eventually received his law degree from the University of Virginia. He became a lawyer, a practice he eventually gave up to become a writer. In 1913, he was appointed by President Woodrow Wilson as Ambassador to Italy where he served six years. The primary setting for his works was his home state, Virginia. His titles include "In Ole Virginia," "Old South," "Red Riders," "Negro, the Southerners" and "Social Life in Virginia." He died on November 1, 1922 in Virginia.

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