Phrenology Made Practical and Popularly Explained

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G. Philip, 1877 - Phrenology - 183 pages
 

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Page 129 - Yet simple Nature to his hope has given, Behind the cloud-topt hill, an humbler heaven; Some safer world in depth of woods embraced, Some happier island in the watery waste, Where slaves once more their native land behold, No fiends torment, no Christians thirst for gold. To Be, contents his natural desire, He asks no Angel's wing, no Seraph's fire; But thinks, admitted to that equal sky, His faithful dog shall bear him company.
Page 164 - Therefore, the poet Did feign that Orpheus drew trees, stones, and floods Since nought so stockish, hard, and full of rage, But music for the time doth change his nature. The man that hath no music in himself, Nor is not moved with concord of sweet sounds, Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils ; The motions of his spirit are dull as night, And his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted.
Page 85 - Intreat me not to leave thee, Or to return from following after thee : For whither thou goest, I will go ; And where thou lodgest, I will lodge : Thy people shall be my people, And thy God my God : Where thou diest, will I die, And there will I be buried : The LORD do so to me, and more also, If ought but death part thee and me.
Page 82 - Cleveland and the swarm of liars that nuzzle in the mud, or sling arrows from ambush, may my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth, and my right hand forget its cunning.
Page 104 - I smile, And cry, Content, to that which grieves my heart ; And wet my cheeks with artificial tears, And frame my face to all occasions.
Page 82 - How dear to my heart are the scenes of my childhood; When fond recollection presents them to view; The orchard, the meadow, the deep tangled wildwood.
Page 130 - Of others' sight familiar were to hers. And this the world calls frenzy; but the wise Have a far deeper madness, and the glance Of melancholy is a fearful gift; What is it but the telescope of truth? Which strips the distance of its fantasies, And brings life near in utter nakedness, Making the cold reality too real!
Page 86 - No, the heart that has truly loved never forgets, But as truly loves on to the close ; As the sun-flower turns on her god, when he sets, The same look which she turned when he rose.
Page 88 - And the Lord God said, It is not good that man should be alone, I will make him an help meet for him.
Page 129 - Lo, the poor Indian! whose untutor'd mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind; His soul, proud science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk, or milky way...

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