An Account of the Religious and Literary Life of Adam Clarke ...: Written by One who was Intimately Acquainted with Him from Boyhood to the Sixtieth Year of His Age, Volumes 1-3

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T. Mason and G. Lane, 1839
 

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Page 779 - Thou sawest till that a stone was cut out without hands, which smote the image upon his feet that were of iron and clay, and brake them to pieces. Then was the iron, the clay, the brass, the silver, and the gold, broken to pieces together, and became like the chaff of the summer threshing-floors ; and the wind carried them away, that no place was found for them: and the stone that smote the image became a great mountain, and filled the whole earth.
Page 74 - The eye that mocketh at his father, and despiseth to obey his mother, the ravens of the valley shall pick it out, and the young eagles shall eat it.
Page 762 - Confirming the souls of the disciples, and exhorting them to continue in the faith, and that we must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God.
Page 701 - If any man be in Christ, he is a new creature, old things are passed away, and behold all things are become new".
Page 779 - Thou, O king, sawest, and behold a great image. This great image, whose brightness was excellent, stood before thee; and the form thereof was terrible.
Page 94 - Oh that I knew where I might find him ! that I might come even to his seat ! I would order my cause before him, and fill my mouth with arguments.
Page 535 - Far from a world of grief and sin, With God eternally shut in.
Page 354 - the dark places of the earth,' which ' are full of the habitations of cruelty,' shall be illumined by the ' Sun of righteousness,' and become subject to the 'Prince of Peace.
Page 706 - Wherefore, beloved, seeing that ye look for such things, be diligent that ye may be found of him in peace, without spot, and blameless.
Page 779 - Awake, my St. John! leave all meaner things To low ambition, and the pride of kings. Let us (since life can little more supply Than just to look about us and to die) Expatiate free o'er all this scene of man; A mighty maze!

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