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Simon's fabulous combat with St Peter

167
A forged Sibylline oracle cited in the Constitutions 178
An emendation of a fault in it

179
The apostolical canons considered

180-183
The Sibylline oracles examined, and rejected as for-
geries and impostures

183—209
Homer's prophecy concerning Æneas and his posteri

185–187
Virgil's fourth Eclogue considered

187-192
Fabricius, his account of the Sibylline oracles 187
Orphic verses, and fragments of Greek poets, &c.

which are cited by the fathers, examined and correc-
ted

192—209
Eusebius not to be charged with defending the Sibyl-
line oracles

201
Justin Martyr not the forger of them

204
Sibylline oracles which were made by Pagans 207–209
Barnabas. The antiquity and the dubious authority
of the epistle ascribed to him

209--212
Some remarks on Clemens Romanus

213
On Hermas and Polycarp

214
The Recognitions of Clemens a wretched romance.
• A passage in them explained

215, 216
The Epistle to Diogne us the work of an uncertain
and inconsiderable writer

216-220
Tillemont. Observations on his sentiments and writ.
ings

220_223
Justin M. and Clemens Alex. had favourable opinions

of the future condition of the virtuous pagans 222-223
Clemens Alex. explained and corrected

223
Ignatius. Remarks on his epistles and his martyrdom 223-233
A reading in one of his epistles defended

224-227
Remarks on a tax instituted by Augustus

234, 235
Appendix

237
Dedication

247
Remarks upon miracles in general

247, 243
Notions of Van Dale and Le Clerc concerning them 247

The

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The opinion that God alone can work miracles, not

probable

248

The miracles of our Saviour and of his Apostles de-

fended

349—264

Quadratus, his testimony concerning miracles 250

A passage in Tertullian corrected

251

The miracles of Christ were of a prophetic nature,

and represented future events

- 256–264

One of St Paul's miracles of the same kind

263

Difference between the writers of the N. T. and the

writers of Legends

262

Reasons for which our Saviour cast out evil spirits 256

Remarks on the Dæmoniacs

161

St Paul, an emblem perhaps of the Jewish nation 263

An answer to the objection made from the miracles of

false Christs

264–266

The Apostles seem to have wronght miracles only

when they were moved by the Holy Spirit 267

Recapitulation of the arguments in behalf of Chris-

tianity

267270

General remarks on the miracles said to have been

wrought after the Apostolical days, in the second

and third centuries,

271-286

These miracles not to be compared, in point of evidence,

with the miracles of Christ and the Apostles 271

The arguments which may be alledged in favour of

them

273

Objections which may be made to them

274

Some of them not improbable

276

Constancy of the martyrs may be ascribed to a divine

assistance

276

The doctrine of a particular providence maintained by

. Woolaston and Le Clerc

- 277–281

The miracles after Constantine deserve no credit 281

Van Dale, Moyle, and Le Clerc; their notions of the

miracles after the days of the apostles

282–285

Middleton not singular in rejecting these miracles 282

287

294

Page Le Clerc's character of Van Dale and Moyle 284 The Christian miracles of different ages : how far credible, or not

285 The improbable story of Abgarus

286
The conversion of the inhabitants of Edessa 287
The Ethopians instructed by the Eunuch
Miracles wrought by apostolical men

288-290 Justin M. of opinion that miraculous gifts had beer continued down to his time

290 St John ; his being put in a vessel of boiling oil a duc bious story

290, 291 Whence it might arise

291 Oil not used in baptism till after the days of Justin 291 Tertullian very credulous

292 His character Papias an injudicious man. Whether an Ebionite 292 The epistle of Tiberianus to Trajan a forgery 293 Remarks on the apologists and their writings 293-300 Quadratus, Aristides, Athenagoras, Melito 293, 294 Christians not forbidden to read certain books 295 The apologies seen in all probability by scme emperors, and serviceable to the Christian cause

295 The character of Adrian

296 The account which he gives of the Egyptians 296 His rescript to Minucius

297
He was no enemy to the Christians
Severus Alexander a friend to the Christians 297
No images in Christian churches till after Constantine 298
The miserable state of the Jews under Adrian 300
Aquila. The account given of him by Epiphanius 300
Fabulous miracles related by Epiphanius
The character of this father
Orosius relates a false miracle

302
A wonder recorded by Josephus which happened be-
fore the destruction of Jerusalem

302 Plutarch. His silence concerning Christianity 303 Quintilian censures the Jews

393 Polycarp

297

300

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322

312

310

316

318

319

Page Polycarp. Remarks on his martyrdom, &c. 303-322 The epistle of the church of Smyrna probably genuine,

tho' possibly interpolated Polycarp's vision

306 The arching of the flames over Polycarp The voice from heaven

309 The sweet smell which came from the pile Many miracles of this trilling kind

311 Miracles ascribed to monks of the fourth century 311 The Hirpi walked barefoot over the fire

313 Trials by fire and water

314 The story of the dove, &c.

316 Stories of the same kind

317
Conjectures concerning sepisepäe
Eusebius mentions it not
Omits a story of the same kind in Josephus 319
Le Clerc's opinion concerning the dove
A mistake of Valesius

320
Polycarp's reply to the Proconsul not blameable
The city of Smyrna ruined by an earthquake
Polycarp's age

321
His martyrdom well attested
The constancy of the martyrs to be ascribed to a di-
vine assistance

322-331 The constancy of persons who were, or were called, heretics

32-5 Mark of Arethusa his sufferings, and the remarks of

Tillemont upon them
Martyrologies usually romantic
Acts of perpetua ancient, but perhaps adulterated 329
The increase of Christianity in times of persecution 331
The alteration for the better which Christianity pro-
duced in those who received it

333
The obstacles which it overcame
Justin Martyr, his character and writings

334-340 His account of the statue of Simon seems to be a mistake

337 Obscure

321

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340

tion

342

Page Obscure and worthless men deified by the Pagans even in his time

337 Authority of the fathers. It is better to defer tco lit

tle than too much to it Justin's Dialogue genuine

340 Hegesippus, a writer of small credit

340 Encratites, their errors Alcibiades, the martyr, reproved for an erroneous no

341 The story of the Thundering Legion improbable 341 Forged rescripts in favour of Christianity

3414-344 Marcus Aurelius, no friend to the Christians The martyrdoin of Apolonius

344 Roman Senate not favourable to Christianity

344 Remarks on Lucian, Apuleius, Porphyry, and the Plan tonic philosophers

345-349 Lucian not an apostate

346 Augustin, his doubts concerning the transformation of Apuleius

346 Mysteries of heretics and philosophers

347 Vigilantius ill used by Jerom Remarks on Jerom

290-348 Porphyry, his concessions in favour of Christianity 348 His writings suppressed

349 Plotinus, his attempt to establish Plato's Republic 349 Smyrna overthrown by an earthquake,

349 The generosity of Marcus Aurelius and of others on that occasion

349 Bardesanes, his character and sentiments

333–350 Melito, whether a prophet

351 State of the Christians in the reign of Commodus 352 The Montanists

252 Tertullian Proculus is said to hare cured Severus with oil. Facts relating to that story

354-357 Severus, his behaviour towards the Christians 356 Rutilius the martyr. His prudent and pious behaviour

357 Theophilus

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