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LONDON: PRINTED BY SPOTTISWOODE AND CO., NEW-STREET SQUARE

AND PARLIAMENT STREET

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MISCELLANEOUS

AND

POSTHUMOUS

WORK WORK

OP

HENRY THOMAS BUCKLE

EDITED WITH A BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICE BY

HELEN TAYLOR

IN THREE VOLUMES

VOL. II.

COMMON PLACE BOOKS

LONDON
LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.

COMMON PLACE BOOK.

I. ETYMOLOGY OF HUGHENOT. “ There have been several fanciful derivations of the word See also Hughenot. It is now supposed to have been originally · Eidge- Apt. 305. nossen,' or 6 associated by oath, the name assumed by the Calvinistic party in Geneva during their contest with the Catholics. From Geneva missionaries penetrated into the south of France, and took with them the appellation of Egnots or Hughenots (Lingard's History of England, vol. v. chap. 11, p. 46).

“ Castelneux informs us that the Reformers got the name of Hughenots in France from being generally of the lower orders, men not worth a hugenot or denier.' Many other etymologies have been proposed, but none more natural or probable” (Ranken’s History of France, vol. vi. p. 45, 8vo, 1818). Villaret (Histoire de France, tome vi. p. 134, Paris, 1770, 4to) derives it from Hugues Aubriot. Robertson (Hist. of Charles V. vol. iii. p. 118, book vi. 8vo, 1806), gives the same etymology as Lingard. Pasquier, Recherches, livre viii. chap. 55, (Euvres, Amsterdam, 1723, tome i. fol. 857. The earliest mention I have seen of it is in a declaration by Elizabeth in 1562, where it is spelt “Huguenoss” (Forbes' State Papers, ii. 73). In the same year it is spelt “ Huguenotz” and “ Huguenoths” (pp. 136, 239).

Elizabeth, in a declaration in 1562, mentions “Hugenotz” as if it were a new expression; for she calls it “a word very strange and folyshe to many of the honest marchantes, and poor maryners (Harleian Miscellany, edit. Park, vol. iii. p. 188).

2. SHORT-HAND INVENTED BY CICERO. “ The manuscript was in short-hand, of which mode of writing, as Bembo informs us on the authority of Plutarch, Cicero was the inventor among the Romans" (Mills' Travels of TheoVOL. I. 42

B

dore Ducas, vol. i. p. 42). Autobiography of Joseph Lister, edited by Thomas Wright, 8vo, 1842, p. 5, No. 2. Bishop Cartwright's Diary, p. xv. Camd. Society. Wilson's Life of De Foe, vol. i. p. 10. Lewis, On Observation in Politics, Lond. 1852, vol. i.

p. 233.

3. LAWS IN RUSSIA RESPECTING MARRIAGE. “ Marriage in Russia is entirely indissoluble. No kind of relationship within the fifth degree is permitted ; two sisters may not even marry two brothers; more than three times no one can be united in wedlock, nor even that without previous fast and penance to qualify the sin, and a priest can never marry a second time, so that a priest's wife is as much cherished as any other good thing that cannot be replaced” (Letters from the Shores of the Baltic, 2nd edit. Lond. 1842, vol. i. p. 84).

5. ORIGIN OF COUNTRY DANCES BEING FASHIONABLE IN ENGLAND.

“ And now Buckingham, having the Chancellor, Treasurer, and all great officers his very slaves, swells at the very height of pride, summons up all the country kindred, the old countess providing a place for them to learn to carry themselves in a courtlike garb, but because they could not learn the French dances so soon as to be in gay clothes, country dances must be the garb of the Court, and none else must be used(The Court and Character of King James, by Sir Anthony Weldon, Lond. 1650, p. 134).

Early in the seventeenth century, the “ Canaries, a quick and lively dance," appears to have been very fashionable (see Middleton's Works, 8vo, 1840, vol. iii. p. 39). In 1608, “ Like dancers upon ropes, once seen are stale” (Middleton, iii. 204).

6. ETYMOLOGY OF COSSACK. See also “ The Cossacks derive their name from the word coza, which in Art. 1816. the language of Poland signifies a goat, alluding to the celerity

of their moving from place to place, and the depredations they make in the countries round them” (The History of Gustavus Adolphus, King of Sweden, by the Rev. Walter Harte, 3rd edit. Lond. 8vo, 1807, vol. i. p. 129).

7. ETYMOLOGY OF WITTENAGEMOT. “ Wittenagemot imports a council of wise men, the Saxon word witta signifying a wise man, and the British word gemot expressing a synod or council. During the Heptarchy each kingdom had its Wittenagemot” (Lectures on the Constitution and Laws of England, by the late P. S. Sullivan, Dublin, 8vo, 1790, p. vi.).

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