The Miscellaneous and Posthumous Works of Henry Thomas Buckle, Volume 2

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Longmans, Green and Company, 1872 - Great Britain
The volumes include essays on aspects of English history and contain Buckle's commonplace books.

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Page 19 - The Sanskrit language, whatever be its antiquity, is of a wonderful structure; more perfect than the Greek, more copious than the Latin, and more exquisitely refined than either, yet bearing to both of them a stronger affinity, both in the roots of verbs and in the forms of grammar, than could possibly have been produced by accident; so strong indeed, that no philologer could examine them all three, without believing them to have sprung from some common source, which, perhaps, no longer exists...
Page 539 - Ecclesiastical History of the Second and Third Centuries, Illustrated from the Writings of Tertullian.
Page 150 - To the Theatre, where was acted 'Beggar's Bush,' it being very well done ; and here the first time that ever I saw women come upon the stage.
Page 117 - Strutt's Sports and Pastimes of the People of England ; including the Rural and Domestic Recreations, May Games, Mummeries, Shows, Processions, Pageants, and Pompous Spectacles, from the Earliest Period to the Present Time. With 140 Illustrations. Edited by WILLIAM HONE. Crown 8vo, with a Map of Suburban London, cloth extra, js.
Page 358 - I rather think it was in his face. Much was the hurry and confusion; cloths and napkins were at hand to make all clean.
Page 307 - An Inquiry into the History and Theology of the ancient Vallenses and Albigenses, as exhibiting, agreeably to the Promises, the Perpetuity of the sincere Church of Christ.
Page 151 - A Specimen of some Errors and Defects in the History of the Reformation of the Church of England ; by Anthony Harmer.
Page 186 - That day she was dressed in white silk, bordered with pearls of the size of beans, and over it a mantle of black silk shot with silver threads; her train was very long, the end of it borne by a marchioness; instead of a chain, she had an oblong collar of gold and jewels. As she went along in all this state and magnificence, she spoke very graciously, first to one, then to another (whether foreign ministers, or those who attend for different reasons), in English, French and Italian ; for besides being...
Page 185 - At these spectacles, and everywhere else, the English are constantly smoaking tobacco, and in this manner: they have pipes on purpose made of clay, into the farther end of which they put the Herb, so dry that it may be rubbed into powder, and putting fire to it, they draw the smoke into their mouths, which they puff out again, through their nostrils, like funnels, along with it plenty of phlegm and defluxion from the head.
Page 160 - For while with their knife, which they hold in one hand, they cut the meate out of the dish, they fasten their forke, which they hold in the other hand, upon the same dish.

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