The Unknown God: Or, Inspiration Among Pre-Christian Races

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A. C. Armstrong and son, 1889 - God - 336 pages
 

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Page 121 - Speak to Him thou for He hears, and Spirit with Spirit can meet — Closer is He than breathing, and nearer than hands and feet.
Page 304 - Sirs, why do ye these things ? We also are men of like passions with you, and bring you good tidings, that ye should turn from these vain things unto the living God, who made the heaven and the earth and the sea, and all that in them is : who in the generations gone by suffered all the nations to walk in their own ways.
Page 292 - Where never creeps a cloud or moves a wind, Nor ever falls the least white star of snow, Nor ever lowest roll of thunder moans, Nor sound of human sorrow mounts to mar Their sacred everlasting calm.
Page 58 - For Jacob my servant's sake, and Israel mine elect, I have even called thee by thy name: I have surnamed thee, though thou hast not known me.
Page 40 - For the living know that they shall die : But the dead know not any thing, Neither have they any more a reward ; For the memory of them is forgotten. Also their love, and their hatred, and their envy, is now perished ; Neither have they any more a portion for ever in any thing that is done under the sun.
Page 39 - For the grave cannot praise Thee, death cannot celebrate Thee : they that go down into the pit cannot hope for Thy truth.
Page 197 - Him let us praise, the golden child that rose In the beginning, who was born the lord — The one sole lord of all that is — who made The earth, and formed the sky, who giveth life, Who giveth strength, whose bidding gods revere, Whose hiding-place is immortality, Whose shadow, death ; who by his might is king Of all the breathing, sleeping, waking world...
Page 154 - What a soul that is which is ready, if at any moment it must be separated from the body, and ready either to be extinguished or dispersed or continue to exist ; but so that this readiness comes from a man's own judgment, not from mere obstinacy, as with the Christians, but considerately and with dignity and in a way to persuade another, without tragic show.
Page 262 - If a man foolishly does me wrong, I will return to him the protection of my ungrudging love; the more evil comes from him, the more good shall go from me; the fragrance of goodness always comes to me, and the harmful air of evil goes to him.

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