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London; PRINTED FOR LONGMAN, REES, OR ME, BROWN, & GREEN PATERNOSTER FOW AND JOHN TAYLOR, UPPER GOWER STREET

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SIR EDWARD COKE

John SELDEN
SIR MATTHEW HALE
LORD GUILFORD
LORD JEFFERIES

LORD SOMERS

LORD MANSFIELD

1550 Norfolk 1634 Ld. Chief Justice 1
1584 Sussex
1609 Gloucestershire 1676 Ld. Chief Justice 59
1640

1685 Lord Keeper | 831 1648 Denbigh 1689 Lord Chancellor 113 1650 Worcester 1716 Lord Chancellor 140 1704 Perth

1776 Ld. Chief Justice 1709

loo S Ch. Justice

1792 Com. Pleas S 1723 Wiltshire 1780 La Chief Justice 240 1731 Devonshire 1783 Solicitor General 287 1736

1806 Lord Chancellor 258 1746. London 1794 in Indias

} 306 1750 Scotland 1823 Lord Chancellor 329 1757 London 1818 Solicitor General 391

stice?

229

SIR J. E. WILMOT
SIR W. BLACKSTONE
LORD ASHBURTON
LORD THURLOW

SIR W. JONES

1794

Chief Judge

LORD ERSKINE
SIR SAMUEL ROMILLY

BIOGRAPHY.

BRITISH LAWYERS.

SIR EDWARD COKE.

1550—1634.

EDWARD COKE, afterwards solicitor and attorney-general, and successively lord chief justice of the courts of common pleas and of the king's bench, was descended from an ancient family in the county of Norfolk. He was the son of Robert Coke, Esq. of Mileham, in that county, a barrister of great practice, and a bencher of Lincoln's Inn, by Winifred, daughter and coheiress of William Knightley, of Morgrave Knightley, in the same county. He was born at Mileham in the year 1550; and at the age of ten years was sent to the free-school at Norwich; whence he was removed to Trinity College, Cambridge, where he remained for four years. At the expiration of that period he became a member of Clifford's Inn; and in the course of the next year of the Inner Temple. While a student of the latter society, he is said to have exhibited proofs of the high legal talents by which he was afterwards so greatly distinguished. At the end of six years he was called to the bar; a very short probation, the usual period being at that time eight years. *

The first case in which he appeared in the king's bench was the Lord Cromwell's case, in Trinity term

* Dugdale's Origines, p. 159. .

B

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