The Tradition of the Trojan War in Homer and the Epic Cycle

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JHU Press, Apr 30, 2003 - Literary Criticism - 320 pages

Although the Iliad and Odyssey narrate only relatively small portions of the Trojan War and its aftermath, for centuries these works have overshadowed other, more comprehensive narratives of the conflict, particularly the poems known as the Epic Cycle. In The Tradition of the Trojan War in Homer and the Epic Cycle, Jonathan Burgess challenges Homer's authority on the war's history and the legends surrounding it, placing the Iliad and Odyssey in the larger, often overlooked context of the entire body of Greek epic poetry of the Archaic Age. He traces the development and transmission of the Cyclic poems in ancient Greek culture, comparing them to later Homeric poems and finding that they were far more influential than has previously been thought.

 

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Contents

VI
3
VII
4
VIII
8
IX
29
X
31
XI
40
XII
43
XIII
45
XIX
139
XX
145
XXI
153
XXII
168
XXIII
173
XXIV
177
XXV
179
XXVI
184

XIV
49
XV
90
XVI
110
XVII
128
XVIII
131
XXVIII
186
XXX
189
XXXI
255
XXXII
275
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Page xvi - The Oxford Classical Dictionary, 3rd ed., ed. S. Hornblower and A. Spawforth (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996), 716-17.

About the author (2003)

Jonathan S. Burgess is an associate professor of classical studies at the University of Toronto.

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