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" But the decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of immoderate greatness. Prosperity ripened the principle of decay; the causes of destruction multiplied with the extent of conquest; and, as soon as time or accident had removed the artificial... "
The Monthly Review, Or, Literary Journal - Page 460
1782
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“The” History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 6

Edward Gibbon - Byzantine Empire - 1781
...monarchy of Rome (5). The rife of a city, which fwelled into an empire, may deferve, as a fingular prodigy, the reflection of a philofophic mind. But...decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of t immoderate greatnefs. Profperity ripened the principle of decay ; the caufes of deftruction multiplied...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 6

Edward Gibbon - Byzantine Empire - 1783
...iron monarchy of Rome s. The rife of a city, which fwelled into an empire, may deferve, as a fingular prodigy, the reflection of a philofophic mind. But...greatnefs. Profperity ripened the principle of decay j the caufes of deftruftion multiplied with the extent of conqueft ; and as foon as time or accident...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 6

Edward Gibbon - Byzantine Empire - 1802
...the refleclion of a philofophic mind. But the decjine of Rome was the natural and inevitable efteft of immoderate greatnefs. Profperity ripened the principle of decay ; the caufes of deftruclion multiplied with the extent of conqueft ; and as foon as time or accident had removed the...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 4

Edward Gibbon - Byzantine Empire - 1821
...(Opera, tom. 5. p. 572.) 1 K 2 ... deserve, as a singular prodigy, the reflection of a philosophic tnind. But the decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of immoderate greatness. Prosperity ripened the principle of decay ; the causes of destruction multiplied with the...
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Gibbon's History of the decline and fall of the Roman empire, repr ..., Volume 3

Edward Gibbon - 1826
...city, which swelled into an empire, may deserve, as a singular prodigy, the reflection of a philosophic mind. But the decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of immoderate greatness. Prosperity ripened the principle of decay; the * Sec Daniel, ii. 31—40. " And the fourth...
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The history of the decline and fall of the Roman empire, with ..., Volume 4

Edward Gibbon - 1854
...city, which swelled into an empire, may deserve, as a singular prodigy, the reflection of a philosophic mind. But the decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of immoderate greatness. Prosperity ripened the principle of decay ; the causes of destruction multiplied with the...
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Heads of an Analysis of Roman History: With Brief Extracts from Standard ...

Dawson William Turner - 1861
...which swelled into an empire, may deserve, as a singular prodigy, the reflections of a philosophic mind. But the decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of immoderate greatness. Prosperity ripened the principle of decay ; the causes of destruction multiplied with the...
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Geschichte der alten Kirche, Volume 1

Philip Schaff - Church history - 1869 - 1250 pages
...Observations on the Fall of the R. Empire in the West am 6*lujft ft« XXXVIII. Лар., too ei fogt: „The decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of immoderate greatness. Prosperity ripened the principle of decay; the §.141. Sultan« eingriff auf bai Sbrifientbum....
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From Constantine the Great to Gregory the Great, A.D. 311-600

Philip Schaff - Reformation - 1870
...Observations on the Fall of the R. Empire in the West, at the close of ch. xxxviii., where he says: "The decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of immoderate greatness. Prosperity ripened the principle of decay ; the causes of destruction multiplied with the...
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The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Volume 3

Edward Gibbon - Byzantine Empire - 1875
...city, which swelled into an empire, may deserve, as a singular prodigy, the reflection of a philosophic mind. But the decline of Rome was the natural and inevitable effect of immoderate greatness. Prosperity ripened the principle of decay ; the causes of destruction multiplied with the...
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