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OF

YOU GHAL,

COMPARED WITH

THE WONDERS OF THE TYROL;

IN

A LETTER

TO THE RIGHT HON.

THE EARL OF SHREWSBURY:

BY

THE REV. JOHN ALDWORTH,

Rector of Youghal, Ireland.

Beloved, believe not every Spirit, but try the Spirits whether they be of God: because

many false prophets are gone into the world.-1 John iv. 1.

LONDON:

W. H. DALTON, COCKSPUR-STREET;
WILLIAM CURRY, JUN., AND COMPANY, DUBLIN ;

W. & M. EVANS, AND THE TRACT SOCIETY, CORK.

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ESTATICA IN YOUGHAL.

TO THE RIGHT HON. THE EARL OF SHREWSBURY.

MY LORD, The position which your Lordship has taken, as promulgating to the British Public the Wonders of the Tyrol, testifying to the phenomena of the Estatica and Addolorata, vouching for the miraculous character of the manifestations, and, as the apologist of your Church, endeavouring to establish some of her strange doctrines by the supposed Divine attestation thus afforded in their favour; and the notoriety which your Lordship’s rank and character have obtained for them, sufficiently vindicates from the charge of presumption, in addressing your Lordship, any individual, however humble, who knowing and loving the Saviour and his truth, desires to examine into the nature of these occurrences, and to test them by the result of similar cases in which detection has ensued from investigation. Jealousy for the honor of the Redeemer, adoring contemplation of the mysteries of his Passion enshrined in the deepest recesses of the soul, and horror of any attempt to dramatize the awful circumstances thereof, would seem to sanction such a proceeding in the private Christian. But providential arrangements seem to have devolved that on me as a duty, which would be a matter of liberty to others.

Placed by him who “walketh in the midst of the golden candlesticks," in the situation of Pastor, in a parish where similar alleged miracles have been enacted, and being fully cognizant of the circumstances connected with the exposure of the fraud, I should be an unfaithful watchman, were I to keep silence now. But further, it happened that many months ago, and shortly

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ust not hinder, nor repugnance induce us to withdraw from

path of duty.

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It may be necessary to introduce the subject by a short acbunt of the establishments in connexion with which these bibitions have been got up; in their origin, progress, and eans of support. Two such have been conducted under the me patronage and management. The first is designated

St. Mary's CATHOLIC COLLEGE, YOUGHAL; for Foreign Misons all over the world ; particularly England, Scotland, and the British Colonies.The Very Rev. John Foley, President.

It owed its foundation to successful speculations connected ith the “ Catholic Total Abstinence Society,” in 1839. The emarkable progress of that under Father Mathew, seems to

ave stimulated this Very Rev. Divine to tread in his steps and =articipate in his rewards. Accordingly, he headed a Secession

om the original Youghal Temperance Society; (which was hixed in its constitution, comprising persons of all denominaPions,) and organised one exclusively Romish, the pledge being

dministered to the member kneeling before the Crucifix, and vhich

appears to be connected with the Sodality of the Sacred heart. The terms seem to have varied from 2s. 6d. to ls. for Crosses or Medals, besides a charge for Certificates. The success which attended was abundant: thousands on thousands Hocked to receive the pledge ; and the result in the extension of sober habits among the people was very beneficial, · The proceeds were applied to the foundation of the College, a large and suitable building in a favourable locality, being procured ; - to which was added a Chapel, erected in a convenient situation, on the grounds. Pupils gathered in from distant counties, and *the progress of the institution is thus noticed, by the Hon. and Rev. Mr. Spencer. In the Catholic Magazine, for May, 1841, Mr. Spencer informs us that :

“ The Rev. John Foley, parish priest of Youghal, in the County of Cork, has established a seminary for Missionaries, and that the number of those who had offered themselves to be brought up under him for Foreign Missions, whether already inmates of the house, or students lodged without, or younger ones in a preparatory course of education, was no less than forty-five. He said, that of those, he was confident that every one would be happy to devote his life to the conversion of England, if a place were offered him; and he proposed to me, if I desired it, to choose six of the most promising subjects immediately, who should, through their whole course of study, consider themselves as destined for

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