Logic: Or, The Right Use of Reason, in the Inquiry After Truth

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George W. Nichols, John West & compnay, Boston, 1809 - Conduct of life - 287 pages
 

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Contents

I
ix
II
1
IV
15
VI
29
VIII
48
IX
101
X
102
XII
105
XV
167
XVI
181
XVII
205
XVIII
208
XIX
232
XX
242
XXI
244
XXII
248

XIII
134

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Page 16 - First, our Senses, conversant about particular sensible objects, do convey into the mind several distinct perceptions of things, according to those various ways wherein those objects do affect them. And thus we come by those IDEAS we have of yellow, white, heat, cold, soft, hard, bitter, sweet, and all those which we call sensible qualities...
Page 131 - It is by this evidence that we know there is such a country as China, and there was such a man as Cicero, who dwelt in Rome. It is by this that most of the transactions in human life are managed : we know our parents and our kindred by this means, we know the...
Page 207 - The three terms are named the major, the minor, and the middle. The predicate of the conclusion is called the major term, because it is generally of a larger extension than the minor term, or the subject.
Page v - Veritas in puteo, truth lies in a well; and to carry on this metaphor we may very justly say, that logic does, as it were, supply us with steps whereby we may go down to reach the water; or it frames the links of a chain, whereby we may draw the water up from the bottom.
Page 65 - ... requires the alteration; for when any word has been used to signify an idea, that old idea will recur in the mind when the word is heard or read, rather than any new idea which we may fasten to it. And this is one reason why the received definition of names should be changed as little as possible.
Page 244 - When we would prove the importance of any scriptural doctrine, or duty, the multitude of texts, wherein it is repeated and inculcated upon the reader, seems naturally to instruct us. that it is a matter of greater importance than other things which are but slightly or singly mentioned in the Bible, "-L.
Page 48 - Furnish yourselves with a rich variety of ideas. Acquaint yourselves with things ancient and modern ; things natural, civil, and religious ; things...
Page 72 - I consider first wherein it agrees with other things which are most like it, namely, summer, spring, autumn, and I find they are all seasons of the year ; therefore a season of the year is the genus. Then I observe wherein it differs from these, and that is in the shortness of the days ; for it is this which does primarily distinguish it from other seasons ; therefore this may be called its special nature, or its difference. Then by joining these together, I make a definition. Winter is that season...
Page 129 - As we learn what belongs to the body by the evidence of sense, so we learn what belongs to the soul by an inward consciousness, which may be called a sort of internal feeling...
Page 207 - That proposition which contains the predicate of the conclusion, connected with the middle term, is usually called the major proposition, whereas the minor proposition connects the middle term with the subject of the conclusion, and is sometimes called the assumption.

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