The Interplay of Consciousness and Concepts

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Rocco J. Gennaro
Imprint Academic, 2007 - Philosophy - 253 pages

Questions on the nature of concepts in philosophy, psychology, and cognitive science, such as 'What are concepts?' and 'What is it to possess a concept?' are notoriously difficult to answer. For example, are concepts abstract mind-independent objects in some Platonic or Fregean sense, or are they better understood as mental representations, such as constituents of thoughts? A common view in cognitive science is that thought is based on word-like mental representations; some say that possessing a concept C involves demonstrating some kind of ability with respect to C's. But which ability? Other longstanding issues concern a proper theory of the structure of concepts. These questions are tackled here by Simon Baron-Cohen, Peter Carruthers, and a distinguished cast of scientists and philosophers.

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Contents

Editorial Essay Rocco J Gennaro
43
Is Consciousness in its Infancy in Infancy? David H Rakison
90
Phenomenal Content and the Richness and Determinacy
112
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Rocco J. Gennaro is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Indiana State University, Terre Haute. He is the author of Consciousness and Self-Consciousness: A Defense of the Higher-Order Thought Theory of Consciousness (1996) and Mind and Brain: A Dialogue on the Mind-Body Problem (1996). Charles Huenemann is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Utah State University. His research interests include early modern philosophy, Kant, and Neo-Kantianism.

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