Modern Mummies: The Preservation of the Human Body in the Twentieth Century

Front Cover
McFarland, Sep 17, 2015 - Social Science - 271 pages
For many, a mummy is an Egyptian pharaoh, wrapped in cloth, found thousands of years later in a pyramid by archaeologists. But mummies need not be ancient. Modern-day mummies can be found under glass in special tombs built in their honor, in private collections where they have come to rest after decades on the carnival circuit, in dissecting rooms of medical schools, and in the basements of funeral homes waiting for decades to be claimed by the next of kin. Stories about the famous (Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, Ho Chi Minh, Eva Peron) and the not-so-famous (Leslie Hansell wanted her body mummified to bask in the sun rather than being buried in the cold ground) mummies are told here in great detail, along with a broader look at the history and process of mummification. The book includes a comprehensive study of the successful prolonged preservation of the human body, and delves into the law and science of modern mummification.
 

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Contents

Preface
1
Introduction
3
The History Law and Science of Modern Mummification
5
Icons Idols and Eccentrics
27
Outlaws Victims and Local Folks
59
Teaching Aids Test Subjects and Teratology Specimens
103
Emulations Innovations and Applications
133
Adventurers Explorers and a Spelunker
167
Servants Patriarchs and Believers
195
Eviction Collection and Neglect
217
9 Conclusion
247
Bibliography
253
Index
259
Copyright

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About the author (2015)

The late Christine Quigley authored books and articles, wrote an eclectic blog called Quigley’s Cabinet and reviewed books for Fortean Times.

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