Contours of Culture: Space and Social Difference in Singapore

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Hong Kong University Press, Mar 1, 2005 - Social Science - 270 pages
This volume discusses the urban history and cultural landscape of Singapore in relation to theories of textual dialogics, multiculturalism and the cultural and political unconscious. Multidisciplinary in approach, it takes as its data not only government policy and official discourses, and the more quantitative elements of population census information on religion, income, race and nationality, but also a wide range of related cultural discourses in film, literature, media texts, social behaviour and other interventions and interpretations of the city. The main parameters of Singapore’s socio-national construction - public housing, social elitism, racial and linguistic plurality and their management, colonial remnants and their transformation - are explained and analysed in terms of Singapore’s colonial past, its rapid modernization, and its current push to compete as a global city and tourist destination. This multidisciplinary book should be of interest to a correspondingly wide readership, including architects and urban planners, political scientists, cultural analysts and theorists, colonial discourse scholars, urban geographers and sociologists, Asian studies specialists, graduate and undergraduate students in the above areas, and a general readership interested in cities and cultures.
 

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Contents

Chapter
10
The Skyline Battle between London and Singapore 2627
26
View of the Armenian Church
37
Void space in a public housing block off Chander Road
40
Fleurdelis relief atop an archway outside the Singapore Art
43
Grapevine relief on a pillar at CHIJMES
45
Chapter 2
53
Colonial and mission architectural elements in a clock tower
66
Tourist map of the Kampong Glam Historic District
121
Malay man selling homemade medicines in the Geylang
125
Restaurant in Little India
136
Metal barriers around HDB Block 671A in the Little India
137
The Social Symbolism of Elitism
143
Advertisement for the Sunhaven condominium
153
Map promoting The Jade condominium
154
Map promoting the Goldenhill Park condominium 156157
156

Art Deco ornamentation on the facade of a block of flats in
67
Signs of antiquity in a brandnew HDB housing estate
68
Amphitheatre at Ang Mo Kio Avenue 4 market
71
Chapter 3
75
Clubhouse in Hougang Avenue 4
79
Chessboard tiling covering a concrete tableandstools set
81
Newspaper advertisement for the Rio Vista condominium near
87
View of Ang Mo Kio Avenue 5
90
Chapter 4
91
Covered walkway emerging at the junction of Ang Mo Kio
93
Multicultural Policy and Resistant Discourses
111
Welcome sign near the entrance of the Malay Village
117
Replica fishingtrading vessel marking the fishing village area
118
Mural in Malay Village depicting food sellers against a
119
Mural in Malay Village caricaturing ethnicity in a pasar
120
Advertisement for the Shell rewards programme
158
Advertisement for the Tanamera Crest private housing
161
An older private housing estate in Singapore
162
34 An older unthemed condominium project
170
A recently developed themed and luxuriously finished private
171
Advertisement for The Tropica condominium project
175
HDB advertisement rendering the HDB landscape as a quasi
178
MappingContesting Singapores Future in a
183
Economic Development Board map with an article on the
190
Singapore Airlines depiction of Singapore published in
194
Conclusion
219
Bibliography
237
Index
255
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Page 17 - Structure is perceived through the incidence of menace, at the moment when imminent danger concentrates our vision on the keystone of an institution, the stone which encapsulates both the possibility and the fragility of its existence. Structure then can be methodically threatened in order to be comprehended more clearly and to reveal not only its supports but also that secret place in which it is neither construction nor ruin but lability.
Page 8 - Marginality is today no longer limited to minority groups, but is rather massive and pervasive; this cultural activity of the non-producers of culture, an activity that is unsigned, unreadable, and unsymbolized, remains the only one possible for all those who nevertheless buy and pay for the showy products through which a productivist economy articulates itself. Marginality is becoming universal.

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CULASI

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