Logic: Or The Right Use of Reason in the Inquiry After Truth

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Bell and Bradfute, 1807
 

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The average reader will have difficulty reading Logic, but they will be rewarded for their efforts with a far deeper understanding of the subject Reason is truly the lost art of our day, as it is likely the case in times past albeit perhaps to lesser degree.

Contents

I
11
II
15
III
17
IV
18
V
23
VI
27
VII
30
VIII
31
XXXVI
131
XXXVII
138
XXXVIII
140
XXXIX
142
XL
144
XLI
146
XLII
150
XLIII
153

IX
33
X
37
XI
38
XII
42
XIII
48
XIV
53
XV
55
XVI
57
XVII
58
XVIII
59
XIX
60
XX
66
XXI
69
XXII
75
XXIII
76
XXIV
78
XXV
79
XXVI
92
XXVII
96
XXVIII
99
XXIX
106
XXX
107
XXXI
112
XXXII
115
XXXIII
119
XXXIV
127
XXXV
128
XLIV
156
XLV
162
XLVI
164
XLVII
170
XLVIII
173
XLIX
186
L
199
LI
215
LII
218
LIII
223
LIV
227
LV
229
LVI
233
LVII
236
LVIII
239
LIX
242
LX
246
LXI
249
LXII
253
LXIII
260
LXIV
262
LXV
266
LXVI
274
LXVII
276
LXVIII
287
LXIX
295

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Page 34 - First, our Senses, conversant about particular sensible objects, do convey into the mind several distinct perceptions of things, according to those various ways wherein those objects do affect them. And thus we come by those IDEAS we have of yellow, white, heat, cold, soft, hard, bitter, sweet, and all those which we call sensible qualities...
Page 205 - The square of the hypothenuse of a right angled triangle is equal to the sum of the squares of both the other sides.
Page 70 - ... visit other cities and countries when you have seen your own, under the care of one who can teach you to profit by travelling, and to make wise observations ; indulge a just curiosity in seeing the wonders of art and nature ; search into...
Page 71 - II. Use the most proper methods to retain that treasure of ideas which you have acquired ; for the mind is ready to let many of them slip, unless some pains and labour be taken to fix them upon the memory. And more especially let those ideas be laid up and preserved with the greatest care, which are most directly suited, either to your eternal welfare as a Christian, or to your particular station and profession in this life; for though the former rule recommends...
Page 72 - At the end of every week, or month, or year, you may review your remarks for these reasons : first, to judge of your own improvement ; when you shall find that many of your younger collections are either weak and trifling; or if they are just and proper, yet they are grown now so familiar to you, that you will thereby see your own advancement in knowledge.
Page 71 - ... universal acquaintance with things, yet it is but a more general and superficial knowledge that is required or expected of any man, in things which are utterly foreign to his own business ; but it is necessary you should have a more particular and accurate acquaintance with those things that refer to your peculiar province and duty in this life, or your happiness in another. There are some persons...
Page 240 - ... if there are two lines, A and B, and I know not whether they are equal or no, I take a third line c, or an inch, and apply it to each of them ; if it agree with them both, then I infer that A and B are equal : but if it agree with one and not with the other, then I conclude A and B are unequal : if it agree with neither of them, there can be no comparison. " So if the question be, whether God must be worshipped...
Page 69 - Furnish yourselves with a rich variety of ideas. Acquaint yourselves with things ancient and modern ; things natural, civil, and religious ; things...
Page 258 - ... my side or on yours ; If the cause goes on my side, you must pay me according to the sentence of the judge ; If the cause goes on your side, you must pay me according to your bargain ; Therefore, whether the cause goes for me or against me, you must pay me the reward. But Euathlus retorted this dilemma, thus : Either I shall gain the cause or lose it ; If I gain the cause, then nothing will be due to you...
Page 70 - The way of attaining such an extensive treasure of ideas is, with diligence to apply yourself to read the best books ; converse with the most knowing and the wisest of men, and endeavor to improve by every person in whose company you are ; suffer no hour to pass away in a...

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