Eminent British Lawyers

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1830 - Great Britain - 428 pages

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Page 2 - God had endowed his Majesty with excellent science and great endowments of nature, but his Majesty was not learned in the laws of his realm of England ; and causes which concern the life or inheritance or goods or fortunes of his subjects are not to be decided by natural reason but by the artificial reason and judgment of law, which law is an act which requires long study and experience before that a man can attain to the cognizance of it...
Page 64 - That there were such creatures as witches he made no doubt at all ; For first, the scriptures had affirmed so much. Secondly the wisdom of all nations had provided laws against such persons, which is an argument of their confidence of such a crime. And such hath been the judgment of this kingdom, as appears by that act of parliament which hath provided punishments proportionable to the quality of the offence.
Page 274 - I can say, and will say, that as a peer of parliament, as speaker of this right honourable house, as keeper of the great seal, as guardian of his majesty's conscience, as lord high chancellor of England, nay, even in that character alone in which the noble duke would think it an affront to be considered...
Page 341 - said the jealous ruler over the desert, encroached upon by the restless foot of English adventure, "who is it that causes this river to rise in the high mountains, and to empty itself into the ocean? Who is it that causes to blow the loud winds of winter, and that calms them again in the summer?
Page 346 - From the moment that any advocate can be permitted to say that he will or will not stand between the Crown and the subject arraigned in the court where he daily sits to practice, from that moment the liberties of England are at an end.
Page 64 - That there were such creatures as witches, he 'made no doubt at all, For, first, the Scriptures had affirmed so much. Secondly, the wisdom of all nations had provided laws against such persons, which is an argument of their confidence of such a crime.
Page 194 - I pass over many anonymous letters I have received. Those in print are public, and some of them have been brought judicially before the court. Whoever the writers are. they take the wrong way ! I will do my duty unawed. What am I to fear? That "mendax infamia" from the press, which daily coins false facts and false motives?
Page 287 - That the influence of the Crown has increased, is increasing, and ought to be diminished"?
Page 274 - Seal, as guardian of his Majesty's conscience, as Lord High Chancellor of England — nay, even in that character alone in which the noble Duke would think it an affront to be considered...

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