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the Shenandoah Valley. Sigel was to collect what force he could spare from the railroad, and move up the valley with a supply train to meet him. The enemy are evidently relying for supplies greatly on such as are brought over the branch road running through Staunton. On the whole, therefore, I think it would be better for General Hunter to move in that direction ; reach Staunton and Gordonsville, or Charlottesville, if he does not meet too much opposition. If he can hold at bay a force equal to his own, he will be doing good service.

In a letter to the Secretary of War, written about one week ago, I recommended Generals Sherman and Meade for promotion to major-generals in the Regular Army, and Hancock for brigadier. I wish you would urge this again. The Secretary replied that there was but one vacancy for major-general. I think this must be a mistake. I was appointed before General Wool was retired, or at least was notified of the fact that an original vacancy existeil before his retirement. General Wright is one of the most meritorious oflicers in the service, and with opportunity will demonstrate his fitness for any position; but at present I doubt whether Sheridan has not most entitled himself to the other vacant brigadier-generalcy. This, however, I would leave open for a time.

U. S. GRANT,

Lieutenant-General.

WASHINGTON, May 20, 1861—? p. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT,

Spotsylvania Court-House, Va.: There are 3,000 wounded men in Fredericksburg, who cannot be removed except by water transportation. General Meigs will send transports to-day to ascend the Rappahannock to-morrow for that purpose. The south bank of the river above Port Royal should be held by our cavalry, in order to enable the transports to pass up. Supplies of forage will accompany the fleet. Large amounts of property have been sent to Fredericksburg. If that place is to be abandoned this property should first be removed. Moreover, the repair of the Aquía Creek Railroad should cease. The navigation of the Rappahannock above Port Royal is difficult, and will cease when the river falls.

H. W. HALLECK, Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864–5.30 a. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT :

GENERAL : Birney reports the enemy having disappeared from his front of last night. He has followed them down to the river at the deserted house, taking several prisoners from their stragglers, and all seem to indicate the presence of Ewell's corps yesterday, and their withdrawal in the night to their intrenchments. I propose now to withdraw Birney and Tyler and leave Russell with Warren's people to keep watch against the return of the enemy. Yours,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864—10.30 a. m. Lieutenant-General GRANT :

GENERAL : I have sent directions to General Wright to prepare himself to hold the right flank of the army with his corps on the withdrawal of Warren. I have also directed two engineer officers to report to him to assist him in laying out his lines. I think it would be well if you should send either Comstock or Babcock to consult and advise with him. He is now rather advanced from the river to throw back his right flank, hold to the river, and have any force to hold the Anderson house, but this will depend greatly on the nature of the ground. Over 470 prisoners have reached the provost-marshal-general from the Second Corps. Warren says Crawford picked up a number.

As soon as they come in and I get returns of casualties ordered, I will report. Respectfully, yours,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864-5.30 p. m. Lieut. Gen. U. S. GRANT,

Commanding : GENERAL: General Ingalls has advices from the gun-boats announcing the Rappahannock River free from all obstructions up to Fredericksburg. This will enable steamers to take away all our wounded, and secures Port Royal for a base in case it should be required. Respectfully,

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

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HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL'S DEPARTMENT,

May 20, 1864. Major-General HUMPHREYS,

Chief of Staff : GENERAL: During the day yesterday, and before the afternoon attack, 6 prisoners were sent from Captain Rider, Fifth Corps. They had been captured one, two, or three days previously. The whole number of prisoners (including 3 commissioned officers) received last evening was 45, sent in by Colonel Kitching, Sixth New York Heavy_Artillery. They were from all brigades of Ewell's corps except Doles', Hays', and Pegram's, and 40 of them were from Rodes' division. One was received from General Warren from A. P. Hill's corps. Captain Leslie of this department was on his way from Fredericksburg during the alarm at the commencement of the attack, and meeting 9 prisoners he sent them to the main guard near Fredericksburg. We have received this morning from General Birney 360 prisoners, fully representing all the brigades of Ewell's corps, including 4 commissioned officers.

SUMMARY. Received yesterday a. m.

6 Received from Colonel Kitching.

45 Received from Fifth Corps..

1 Sent to Fredericksburg,

9 Received from General Birney.

360 One commissioned officer and 1 private received this a. m. from Fifth Corps.. 2 Additional received from General Birney......

9

432 GEORGE H. SHARPE,

Colonel, &c.

ORDERS.]
HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1861–8 a. m. The major-general commanding desires to express his satisfaction with the good conduct of Tyler's division and Kitching's brigade of heavy artillery in the affair of yesterday evening. The gallant manner in which these commands (the greater portion being for the first time under fire) met and checked the persistent attack of a corps of the enemy led by one of his ablest generals, justifies the commanding general in this special commendation of troops who henceforward will be relied upon as were the tried veterans of the Second and Fifth Corps at the same time engaged. By command of Major-General Meade :

S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS, HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
No. 140.

May 20, 1864.

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3. The wounded now with this army will at once be sent to Fredericksburg under the general direction of the chief quartermaster and medical director. Corps commanders will furnish such medical officers, attendants, and supplies as may be required by their medical directors for the wounded. By command of Major-General Meade :

S. WILLIAMS, Assistant Adjutant-General,

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864. Major-General WARREN : The supply and other

trains of the army will move to-morrow from Fredericksburg to Guiney's Station.

A. A. HUMPHREYS,

Major-General and Chief of Staff. (Same to Hancock and Wright.)

ARTILLERY HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864. Col. F. MCGILVERY, Comdg. Ammunition Park:

COLONEL: The number of guns in this army for which ammunition is to be transported is as follows: Eighty-eight light 12-pounders, sixteen Parrotts, one hundred and two 3-inch. For them 20 rounds each are to be carried in the wagons of the artillery park. The number of wagons for the ammunition train proper is, therefore, sixteen for light 12-pounders, seventeen for rifles, which should be loaded, 112 rounds of light 12-pounder, 140 of rifle, per wagon. Two wagons are allowed in addition for primers, fuses, &c. Eight wagons for the mortar battery. Of these forty-three wagons nine wagons are allowed for transport of forage. The wagons for the above-stated purposes now with the artillery park, over and above the allowance, will be turned over to the quartermaster's department.

If there is more ammunition than above stated now in the train the excess will be stored in a safe place in Fredericksburg, if a room for the purpose can be procured, and issued from time to time as the batteries make requisition for it. If you leave Fredericksburg before it is all issued, it will be turned over to the quartermaster's department for transport to Belle Plain, unless there is an ordnance officer at Fredericksburg to take charge of it, in which case it will be turned over to him. You will proceed at once to organize your command for the field, as you may receive orders at any hour to move, and report your readiness to the chief of artillery. By command of General Hunt:

JNO. N. CRAIG, Assistant Adjutant-General.

ARTILLERY HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864—10 p. m. Capt. D. R. RANSOM,

Commanding Second Brigade Horse Artillery: CAPTAIN: You will report with your brigade to Lieutenant-Colonel Gould, commanding dismounted cavalry at Fredericksburg, and move with him until further orders. Respectfully, your obedient servant,

HENRY J. HUNT, Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery.

ARTILLERY HEADQUARTERS, ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864-10 p. m. Col. F. McGILVERY, Comdg. Ammunition Park:

COLONEL: You will move with the train which has orders to move 'to-night, picking up the battalion of Fifteenth New York Artillery which is at the cross-roads, and which has orders to join you as your guard and part of your command. You will remain and move with the main train until further orders, reporting from time to time, as opportunity offers, your locality and condition. Respectfully, &c.,

HENRY J. HUNT, Brigadier-General and Chief of Artillery.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864—9.30 a. m. Major-General HANCOCK, Comdg. Second Corps:

The commanding general directs me to say that some portion of your troops have been passing back to the position of yesterday along the edge of the field in view of the enemy. They should be directed to pass through the woods to the rear of these headquarters, out of view of the enemy.

A. A. HUMPHREYS, Major-General and Chief of Staff.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1861-1 p. m. (Received 2.30 p. m.) Major-General HANCOCK :

The orders given you yesterday will be repeated to-night. You will start at such time as, in your judgment, will best secure the object of the expedition. Please communicate this briefly to Brigadier-General Torbert.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1861–7 p. m. Major-General HANCOCK :

I expect you will find opposition to your crossing of the Mattapony-probably batteries and a small force. Keep your pontoon train near you and endeavor to throw a bridge as soon as possible, at some point where you can command the crossing:

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND CORPS,

May 20, 1861–8.52 p. m. General HUMPHREYS:

My command moves at 11 p. m. I shall move as fast as the cavalry can push on before daylight and as rapidly as possible after. I propose to destroy Guiney's, Downer's, and Burke's Bridges. These points will be so far in my rear, I ought not to leave any force to watch them after my column passes, though it ought perhaps to be done.

WINF’D S. HANCOCK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,

May 20, 1864–9 p. m. Major-General HANCOCK :

I see no occasion for the destruction of the bridges proposed by you. They will be wanted for communication and for other columns. Unless the enemy attack us to-morrow, you will be followed on your right flank, early in the day, by Warren, who will move on the Telegraph road.' Perhaps I do not understand the bridges referred to. Do you mean those you will cross, and are these bridges on roads to your right flank leading into the one you move on ? Even then, they will be needed to keep up communication with Warren, in case he succeeds in crossing the Po.

GEO. G. MEADE,

Major-General.

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