The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom: Rebellion and the Blasphemy of Empire

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University of Washington Press, 2004 - History - 235 pages
Occupying much of Imperial China’s Yangzi River heartland and costing over twenty million lives, the Taiping Rebellion (1851–1864) was no ordinary peasant revolt. What most distinguished this dramatic upheaval from earlier rebellions was the Taiping faith of the rebels. Inspired by a Protestant missionary tract, the core of the Taiping faith focused on the belief that Shangdi, the high God of classical China, had chosen the Taiping leader, Hong Xiuquan, to establish his Heavenly Kingdom on Earth.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
ix
Introduction
3
The Early Catholic Search for the Name of God
19
The Protestant Bible and the Birth of the Taiping Christian Movement
54
The Taiping Challenge to Empire
78
Worship and Witness in the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom
117
The Taiping Legacy and Missionary Christianity
150
Notes
173
Glossary
209
Bibliography
213
Index
225
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About the author (2004)

Russ Christensen has spent over four years with the Pa-O in the Mae Hong Son area of northern Thailand. Sann Kyaw, and ethnic Pa-O, completed two years at the University of Mandalay before the universities were closed in 1988.

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