The Life of Wesley: And the Rise and Progress of Methodism, Volume 1

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1820 - Clergy - 622 pages

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Page 168 - In the evening I went very unwillingly to a society in Aldersgate Street, where one was reading Luther's preface to the Epistle to the Romans. About a quarter before nine, while he was describing the change which God works in the heart through faith in Christ, I felt my heart strangely warmed.
Page 382 - Take us the foxes, the little foxes, that spoil the vines: for our vines have tender grapes.
Page 271 - Having therefore, brethren, boldness to enter into the holiest by the blood of Jesus, by a new and living way which he hath consecrated for us, through the veil, that is to say, his flesh : and having an high priest over the house of God ; let us draw near with a true heart in full assurance of faith, having our hearts sprinkled from an evil conscience, and our bodies washed with pure water.
Page 184 - I have set watchmen upon thy walls, O Jerusalem, which shall never hold their peace day nor night : ye that make mention of the Lord, keep not silence, and give him no rest, till he establish, and till he make Jerusalem a praise in the earth.
Page 390 - ... with all his heart, and with all his soul, and with all his strength, and therefore they loved him as truly and as fervently as he loved England.
Page 244 - And recovering of sight to the blind, To set at liberty them that are bruised, To proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord.
Page 33 - Whatever weakens your reason, impairs the tenderness of your conscience, obscures your sense of God, or takes off the relish of spiritual things; in short, whatever increases the strength and authority of your body over your mind; that thing is sin to you, however innocent it may be in itself.
Page 77 - Our end in leaving our native country was not to avoid want, (God having given us plenty of temporal blessings,) nor to gain the dung or dross of riches or honour ; but singly this, — to save our souls ; to live wholly to the glory of God.
Page 123 - I saw clearly the hour was come for leaving this place : And as soon as Evening Prayers were over, about eight o'clock, the tide then serving, I shook off the dust of my feet, and left Georgia, after having preached the Gospel there (not as I ought, but as I was able) one year, and nearly nine months.
Page 108 - Is there a thing beneath the sun That strives with Thee my heart to share ? Ah, tear it thence, and reign alone, The Lord of every motion there ! Then shall my heart from earth be free, When it hath found repose in Thee.

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