Page images
PDF
EPUB

CONTENTS.

VOL. III.

Section XXXVI.

Page View of the Revival of Learning in England, continued. Reformation of Religion. Its effects on Literature in England. Application of this digression to the main subject ........

................ 1

Section XXXVII. Petrarch's sonnets. Lord Surrey. His education, travels, mistress, life,

and poetry. He is the first writer of blank-verse. Italian blank-verse. Surrey the first English classic poet ..........

Section XXXVIII.
Sir Thomas Wyat. Inferior to Surrey as a writer of Sonnets. His Life.

His Genius characterised. Excels in Moral Poetry....

.....

41

Section XXXIX.
The first printed Miscellany of English Poetry. Its Contributors. Sir

Francis Bryan, Lord Rochford, and Lord Vaulx. The First True Pas-
toral in English. Sonnet-writing cultivated by the Nobility. Sonnets
by King Henry the Eighth. Literary character of that king ............ 51

Section XL. The Second Writer of Blank-verse in English. Specimens of early Blankverse .......... ............................

.............

65

Section XLI.
Andrew Borde. Bale. Ansley. Chertsey. Fabyll's Ghost, a poem.

The Merry Devil of Edmonton. Other minor Poets of the Reign of
Henry the Eighth ..........

............

72

Section XLII. John Heywood the Epigrammatist. His Works examined. Ancient unpublished burlesque Poem of Sir Penny .........

............ 84

Section XLIII.

Page Sir Thomas More's English Poetry. Tournament of Tottenham. Its age

and scope. Laurence Minot. Alliteration. Digression illustrating comparatively the language of the fifteenth century, by a specimen of the Metrical Armoric Romance of Ywayn and Gawayn ........

..... 94 Section XLIV. The Notbrowne Mayde. Not older than the sixteenth century. Artful

contrivance of the story. Misrepresented by Prior. Metrical Romances, Guy, syr Bevys, and Kynge A polyn, printed in the reign of Henry. The Scole howse, a Satire. Christmas Carols. Religious Libels in rhyme. Merlin's Prophecies. Laurence Minot. Occasional disquisition on the late continuance of the use of waxen tablets. Pageantries of Henry's Court. Dawn of Taste .........

..... 123

Section XLV.
Effects of the Reformation on our poetry. Clement Marot's Psalms. Why

adopted by Calvin. Version of the Psalms by Sternhold and Hopkins.
Defects of this version, which is patronised by the Puritans in opposition
to the Choral Service ..........

........ 142

Section XLVI.
Metrical versions of Scripture. Archbishop Parker's Psalms in metre.

Robert Crowley's puritanical poetry ...

.............. 157

Section XLVII.
Tye's Acts of the Apostles in rhyme. His merit as a Musician. Early

piety of king Edward the Sixth. Controversial Ballads and Plays.
Translation of the Bible. Its effects on our Language. Arthur Kel-
ton's Chronicle of the Brutes. First Drinking-song. Gammer Gurton's
Needle .................

..... 167

Section XLVIII.
Reign of queen Mary. Mirrour for Magistrates. Its inventor, Sackville

lord Buckhurst. His life. Mirrour for Magistrates continued by Bald-
wyn and Ferrers. Its plan and stories .............

........ 181

Section XLIX.
Sackville's Induction to the Mirrour for Magistrates. Examined. A pre-

lude to the Fairy Queen. Comparative View of Dante's Inferno ...... 190

Section L.
Sackville's Legend of Buckingham in the Mirrour for Magistrates. Ad-

ditions by Higgins. Account of him. View of the early editions of this Collection. Specimen of Higgins's Legend of Cordelia, which is copied by Spenser........

..... 215

Section LI. View of Niccols's edition of the Mirrour for Magistrates. High estimation of this Collection. Historical Plays, whence....

..... 224 . Section LII.

Page Richard Edwards. Principal poet, player, musician, and buffoon, to the

courts of Mary and Elizabeth. Anecdotes of his life. Cotemporary testimonies of his merit. A contributor to the Paradise of Daintie Devises. His book of comic histories, supposed to have suggested Shakspeare's Induction of the Tinker. Occasional anecdotes of Antony Munday and Henry Chettle. Edwards's songs............................... 237

Section LIII. Tusser. Remarkable circumstances of his life. His Husbandrie, one of our earliest didactic poems, examined

............. 248

Section LIV.
William Forrest's poems. His Queen Catharine, an elegant manuscript,

contains anecdotes of Henry's divorce. He collects and preserves an-
cient music. Puritans oppose the study of the classics. Lucas Shep-
herd. John Pullayne. Numerous metrical versions of Solomon's Song.
Censured by Hall the satirist. Religious rhymers. Edward More.
Boy-bishop, and miracle-plays, revived by queen Mary. Minute par-
ticulars of an ancient miracle-play .........

.......... 257

Section LV.
English Language begins to be cultivated. Earliest book of Criticism in

English. Examined. Soon followed by others. Early critical systems of the French and Italians. New and superb editions of Gower and Lydgate. Chaucer's monument erected in Westminster Abbey. Chaucer esteemed by the Reformers .........

................ 271

Section LVI.
Sackville's Gorboduc. Our first regular tragedy. Its fable, conduct, cha-

racters, and style. Its defects. Dumb-show. Sackville not assisted
by Norton .........

............... 289

Section LVII.
Classical drama revived and studied. The Phænissæ of Euripides trans-

lated by Gascoigne. Seneca's Tragedies translated. Account of the
translators, and of their respective versions. Queen Elizabeth translates
a part of the Hercules Oetæus ...........

...... 302

Section LVIII.
Most of the classic poets translated before the end of the sixteenth century.

Phaier’s Eneid. Completed by Twyne. Their other works. Phaier's
Ballad of Gad's-hill. Stanihurst's Eneid in English hexameters. His
other works. Fleming's Virgil's Bucolics and Georgics. His other
works. Webbe and Fraunce translate some of the Bucolics. Fraunce's
other works. Spenser's Culex. The original not genuine. The Ceiris
proved to be genuine. Nicholas Whyte's story of Jason, supposed to be

Page

a version of Valerius Flaccus. Golding's Ovid's Metamorphoses. His other works. Ascham's censure of rhyme. A translation of the Fasti revives and circulates the story of Lucrece. Euryalus and Lucretia. Detached fables of the Metamorphoses translated. Moralisations in fashion. Underdowne’s Ovid's Ibis. Ovid's Elegies translated by Marlowe. Remedy of Love, by F, L. Epistles by Turberville. Lord Essex a translator of Ovid. His literary character. Churchyard's Ovid's Tristia. Other detached versions from Ovid. Ancient meaning and use of the word Ballad. Drant's Horace. Incidental criticism on Tully's Oration pro Archia ..........

............... 319

Section LIX.
Kendal's Martial. Marlowe's versions of Coluthus and Museus. Gene-

ral character of his Tragedies. Testimonies of his cotemporaries. Specimens and estimate of his poetry. His death. First Translation of the Iliad by Arthur Hall. Chapman's Homer. His other works. Version of Clitophon and Leucippe. Origin of the Greek erotic romance. Palingenius translated by Googe. Criticism on the original. Specimen and merits of the translation. Googe's other works. Incidental stricture on the philosophy of the Greeks .........

............... 349

Section LX.
Translation of Italian Novels. Of Boccace. Paynter's Palace of Plea-

sure. Other versions of the same sort. Early metrical versions of Boc-
cace's Theodore and Honoria, and Cymon and Iphigenia. Romeus and
Juliet. Bandello translated. Romances from Bretagne. Plot of Shak-
speare's Tempest. Miscellaneous Collections of translated novels before
the year 1600. Pantheon. Novels arbitrarily licensed or suppressed.
Reformation of the English press ............

................. 372

Section LXI. General view and character of the poetry of queen Elizabeth's age......... 395

Section LXII.
Reign of Elizabeth. Satire. Bishop Hall. His Virgidemiarum. MS.

poems of a Norfolk gentleman. Examination of Hall's Satires ......... 403

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Section LXIV.
Hall's Satires continued. His Mundus alter et idem. His Epistles. As-

cham's Letters. Howell's Letters ..........

433

Section LXV:
Marston's Satires. Hall and Marston compared ..........

.... 441

Section LXVI.
Epigrams and Satires. Skialetheia. A Scourge of Truth. Scourge of

Page Truth by John Davies of Hereford. Chrestoloros by Thomas Bastard. Microcynicon by T. M. Gent. William Goddard's Mastiff Whelp. Pasquill’s Mad-Cap, Message, Foole-Cap. Various collections of Epigrams. Rowland's Letting of Humours blood in the head vaine. Lodge, Greene and Decker’s Pamphlets. Catalogue of Epigrammatic Miscellanies. Satires by G. Walter. Donne's Satires ........

......... 451

Index

........ 469

« PreviousContinue »