The Art and Craft of Natural Dyeing: Traditional Recipes for Modern Use

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Univ. of Tennessee Press, 1990 - Crafts & Hobbies - 222 pages
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"This is the most comprehensive manual written on natural dyes since the early 1800s. Jim Liles has rescued ancient skills from near-extinction and shared them in a book that will inspire, challenge, and guide the modern dyer."--Rita Buchanan, author of A Weaver's Garden, and editor of the new Brooklyn Botanic Gardens Handbook on Natural Dyes
" . . . a must for every dyer. The recipes are explicit and detailed as to success and failure."--Mary Frances Davidson

For several thousand years, all dyes were of animal, vegetable, or mineral origin, and many ancient civilizations possessed excellent dye technologies. The first synthetic dye was produced in 1856, and the use of traditional dyes declined rapidly thereafter. By 1915 few non-synthetics were used by industry or craftspeople. The craft revivals of the 1920s explored traditional methods of natural dyeing to some extent, particularly with wool, although the great eighteenth- and nineteenth-century dye manuals, which recorded the older processes, remained largely forgotten.

In The Art and Craft of Natural Dyeing, J. N. Liles consolidates the lore of the older dyers with his own first-hand experience to produce both a history of natural dyes and a practical manual for using pre-synthetic era processes on all the natural fibers--cotton, linen, silk, and wool. A general section on dyeing and mordanting and a glossary introduce the beginner to dye technology. In subsequent chapters, Liles summarizes the traditional dye methods available for each major color group. Scores of recipes provide detailed instructions on how to collect ingredients--flowers, weeds, insects, wood, minerals--prepare the dyevat, troubleshoot, and achieve specific shades.

The book will appeal not only to beginning and veteran dyers but to students of restorations and reconstruction as well as to craftspeople--spinners, quilters, weavers, knitters, and other textile artists--interested in natural dyes for their beauty and historical authenticity.

The Author: J. N. Liles is professor of zoology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He has taught at Arrowmont School and other regional craft schools and has exhibited his work at the Arrowmont School, the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild Folk Art Center, and the Carol Reece Museum.
 

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Dear Sir,
i would like to know about the AATCC & ISO test method on line avalability of the boooks/perticular require methods.
Kindly provide me such facility...
Kind Regards
kashiram.rote@gmail.com
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

This is my go-to book in the dye studio. If you want a table top book to pick up and browse, this is not it. If you want a reference and technical book to help you create the colors you want on cloth with natural dyes, I don't think you could find a better book. The recipes are great, the historical and chemical background interesting if you are interested in the subject. :) Thank you Jim for the years of research this must have taken.  

Contents

Introduction
1
Dyeing Procedures
7
Yellow Dyes
33
Blue Dyes
43
Red Dyes
102
Green Dyes
145
Purple Dyes
155
Orange Dyes
167
Brown Dyes
174
Gray and Black Dyes
184
Appendixes
195
Glossary
209
Index
219
Copyright

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Page 215 - Reissue of THE ART OF DYEING WOOL, SILK AND COTTON. Translated from the French of M. HELLOT, M. MACQUER and M. LE PILEUR D'APLIGNY. First Published in English in 1789. Six Plates. Demy 8vo. 446 pp.

About the author (1990)

The Author: J. N. Liles is professor of zoology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. He has taught at Arrowmont School and other regional craft schools and has exhibited his work at the Arrowmont School, the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild Folk Art Center, and the Carol Reece Museum.

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