The history of England: as well ecclesiastical as civil, Volume 10

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Printed for James and John Knapton, 1732 - Great Britain
 

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Page 256 - ... the corner of the napkin, wherein the bread was laid, and when he beheld the bread he laid it down again, flew back a step or two, bowed three several times towards it, then he drew near again and opened the napkin and bowed as before.
Page 174 - Majesty, that no man hereafter be compelled to make or yield any gift, loan, benevolence, tax, or such like charge, without common consent by act of parliament...
Page 256 - Then he laid his hand on the cup, which was full of wine, with a cover upon it, which...
Page 175 - ... and that your Majesty would also vouchsafe to declare, that the awards, doings, and proceedings to the prejudice of your people, in any of the premises, shall not be drawn hereafter into consequence or example : and that your Majesty would be also graciously pleased, for the further comfort and safety of your people, to declare your royal will and pleasure, that in the things aforesaid all your officers and ministers shall serve you, according to the laws and statutes of this realm, as they tender...
Page 343 - God for this effect: we promise and swear, by the GREAT NAME OF THE LORD OUR GOD, to continue in the profession and obedience of the...
Page 174 - And also sundry grievous offenders, by colour thereof claiming an exemption, have escaped the punishments due to them by the laws and statutes of this your realm, by reason that divers of your officers and ministers of justice have unjustly refused or...
Page 174 - By pretext whereof some of Your Majesty's subjects have been by some of the said commissioners put to death, when and where, if, by the laws and statutes of the land, they had deserved death, by the same laws and statutes also they might, and by no other ought, to have been judged and executed.
Page 58 - Remember that parliaments are altogether in my power for their calling, sitting and dissolution; therefore as I find the fruits of them good or evil, they are to continue or not to be.
Page 202 - ... as for Tonnage and Poundage, it is a thing I cannot want, and was never intended by you to ask, nor meant by me — I am sure — to grant. To conclude, I command you all that are here to take notice of what I have spoken at this time, to be the true intent and meaning of what I granted you in your Petition ; but especially, you my Lords the Judges...
Page 173 - Great Charter and other the Laws and Statutes of this Your Realm, no Man ought to be adjudged to Death but by the Laws...

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