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Queen. -- Literary Tasks. -Rumor of his Marriage. - House in Victoria-square.- His
Niece. - Petrarch. - Starts for the Brunnens of Nassau. - Hallam. - German Children.
- Return to England. - The Pilgrim of Glencoe.- New Edition of his Works. - Retires to
Boulogne. - His Last Year. — The Closing Scene. -- His Funeral. - Westminster Abbey.
- Horace Smith's Poem, “ Campbell's Funeral,"

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GERTRUDE OF WYOMING. Part I.

211

Part II.

.221

Part III.

229

Lines written at the request of the Highland Society in London, when met to commem-

orate the 21st of March, the Day of Victory in Egypt,

243

Stanzas to Memory the Spanish Patriots latest killed in Resisting the Regency

and the Duke of Angoulême, .

244

Song of the Greeks, .

246

Ode to Winter,

248

Lines spoken by Mrs. Bartley at Drury-Lane Theatre, on the first opening of the

House after the Death of the Princess Charlotte, 1817,

Lines on the Grave of a Suicide,

Reullura,

. 253

The Turkish Lady,

The Brave Roland,

261

The Spectre Boat: a Ballad,

262

The Lover to his Mistress on her Birth-day,

264

Song: “0, how Hard," .

Adelgitha,

265

Lines on Receiving a Seal with the Campbell Crest, from K. M-

before her Mar-

riage,

266

Gilderoy,

268

Stanzas on the threatened Invasion, 1803,

269

The Ritter Bann,

Song : “Men of England,"

Song : "Drink ye to her," .

278

The Harper, ..

The Wounded Hussar,

273

Love and Madness : an Elegy,

281

Hallowed Ground,

284

Song : “Withdraw not yet,"

287

Caroline. Part I.

288

Part II. To the Evening Star,

289

The Beech-tree's Petition,

291

Field-flowers,

292

Song: “To the Evening Star,"

293

Stanzas to Painting, .

The Maid's Rcmonstranco, .

Absence, ...

Lines inscribed on the Monument erected by the Widow of Admiral Sir G. Campbell,

K.C.B., to the Memory of her Husband, .

Stanzas on the Battle of Navarino,

Lines on Revisiting a Scottish River,

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The “ Name Unknown : " in Imitation of Klopstock,

302

Farewell to Love, ·

Lines on the Camp Hill, near Hastings,

304

Lines on Poland,

A Thought suggested by the New Year, .

Song : “ How Delicious is the Winning,"

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Margaret and Dora,

The Power of Russia,

Lines on Leaving a Scene in Bavaria,

The Death-boat of Heligoland,

Song: “When Love came first to Earth,”

Song : " Earl March looked on his Dying Child,"

324

Song: “When Napoleon was flying,"

. 325

Lines to Julia M-, sent with a Copy of the Author's Poems,

. 325

Drinking-song of Munich,

326

Lines on the Departure of Emigrants for New South Wales, .

327

Lines on Revisiting Cathcart,

331

The Cherubs : suggested by an Apologue in the Works of Franklin,

Senex's Soliloquy on his Youthful Idol,

335

To Sir Francis Burdett, on his Speech delivered in Parliament, August 7, 1832,

respecting the Foreign Policy of Great Britain, .

Ode to the Germans,

Lines on a Picture of a Girl in the attitude of Prayer, by the Artist Gruse, in the pos-

session of Lady Stepney,

339

Lines on the View from St. Leonard's, .

The Dead Eagle : written at Oran,

Song : “ To Love in my Heart,"

. 318

Lines written in a Blank Leaf of La Perouse's Voyages,

The Pilgrim of Glencoe,

352

Napoleon and the British Sailor,

. 369

Benlomond,

371

The Child and Hind,

The Jilted Nymph,

On getting Home the Portrait of a Female Child,

The Parrot,

Song of the Colonists departing for New Zealand, .

. 381

Moonlight, :

Song on our Queen, .

. 384

Cora Linn, or the Falls of the Clyde,

. 385

Chaucer and Windsor,

. 386

Lines suggested by the Statue of Arnold von Winkelried,

. 387

To the United States of North America,

Lines on my New Child-sweetheart,

The Launch of a First-rate,

Epistle from Algiers to Horace Smith,

391

To a Young lady,

303

Fragment of an Oratorio,

To my Niece, Mary Campbell,

FUGITIVE POEMS NOW FIRST COLLECTED.

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THOMAS CAMPBELL was born on the 27th of July, 1777, in a house in the High-street, in Glasgow, at that time, and for fourteen years afterwards, occupied by his father, but since pulled down to make way for modern improvements. His family was of a numerous and respectable connection, and the particular branch from which he was descended had been long settled in that part of the Argyle frontier which lies between Lochawe and Lochfyne. They were known as the Campbells of Kirnan, from the name of the estate which was cupied by the poet's grandfather, the last of his race who resided there. He died leaving three sons, and Kirnan passed into the hands of Robert, the eldest, who was fond of display, and lavish in his hospitality, and was compelled to part with the ancestral acres to a neighboring proprietor, the son of Mrs. Campbell by a former marriage. Robert afterwards settled in London ; distinguished himself as a political writer in defence of the Walpole administration, and died soon after its close. Archibald, the next brother, became a Presbyterian minister, and in that capacity went out to Jamaica, but subsequently removed to the Province of Virginia, where he resided till his death at an advanced age. His family there maintained a highly respectable character, and one of his sons was District Attorney during the administration of Washington. To his landed property in Virginia he gave the name of Kirnan, and his grandson

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