The Iliad, tr. by mr. Pope. [With notes partly by W. Broome. Preceded by] An essay on ... Homer [by T. Parnell].

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Page 93 - The Pleiads, Hyads, with the northern team; And great Orion's more refulgent beam; To which, around the axle of the sky, The Bear, revolving, points his golden eye, Still shines exalted on th' ethereal plain, Nor bathes his blazing forehead in the main.
Page 82 - Last o'er the dead the milk-white veil they threw; That done, their sorrows and their sighs renew. Meanwhile to Juno, in the realms above, (His wife and sister,) spoke almighty Jove. "At last thy will prevails: great Peleus' son Rises in arms: such grace thy Greeks have won.
Page 81 - The body then they bathe with pious toil, Embalm the wounds, anoint the limbs with oil, High on a bed of state extended laid, And decent cover'd with a linen shade; Last o'er the dead the milk-white veil they threw; That done, their sorrows and their sighs renew. Meanwhile to Juno, in the realms above, (His wife and sister,) spoke almighty Jove. "At last thy will prevails: great Peleus...
Page 245 - His shield (a broad circumference) he bore; Then graceful as he stood, in act to throw The lifted javelin, thus...
Page 150 - For Peleus breathes no more the vital air; Or drags a wretched life of age and care, But till the news of my sad fate invades His hastening soul, and sinks him to the shades.
Page 62 - She said, and left the caverns of the main, All bathed in tears ; the melancholy train Attend her way. Wide-opening part the tides, While the long pomp the silver wave divides. Approaching now, they touch'd the Trojan land ; Then, two by two, ascended up the strand.
Page 81 - Weep all the night, and murmur all the day Spoils of my arms, and thine ; when, wasting wide, Our swords kept time, and conquer'd side by side...
Page 37 - Hither turn, (he said,) Turn where distress demands immediate aid; The dead, encircled by his friends, forego, And save the living from a fiercer foe.
Page 169 - Th' infernal monarch rear'd his horrid head, Leap'd from his throne, lest Neptune's arm should lay His dark dominions open to the day, And pour in light on Pluto's drear abodes, Abhorr'd by men, and dreadful ev'n to gods. Such war th' immortals wage; such horrors rend The world's vast concave, when the gods contend.
Page 67 - Charg'd with refulgent arms, (a glorious load) Vulcanian arms, the labour of a God.

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