London Magazine: Or, Gentleman's Monthly Intelligencer..., Volume 11

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C. Ackers, 1742 - English essays
 

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Page 643 - King continues obstinately to employ a minister who, they think, oppresses them at home, and betrays them abroad. We are, therefore, in duty to our Sovereign, obliged to inquire into the conduct of a minister when it becomes generally suspected by the people, in order that we may vindicate his character if he...
Page 507 - To enrol the fair deeds of his youth ! When you mention the acts of his age, Leave a blank for his honour and truth ! Say, he made a great monarch * change hands : He spake — and the minister f fell.
Page 643 - ... if long Parliaments be continued, and a corrupt influence should prevail, not only at elections, but in this House, the voice of this House will generally be very different from, nay, often directly contrary to, the voice of the people. However, as this is not, I...
Page 549 - Engagements, though attack'd in his own Dominions; the Stop which has been hitherto put to the ambitious Defigns of the Court of Spain in Italy, (to which, the Operations of my Fleet, in the Mediterranean, have fo vifibly contributed ; ) the Change of Affairs in the North, which has appeared by the publick...
Page 643 - I hope there is a majority of us who know what is the voice of the people ; and if it be admitted by all that the nation is at...
Page 643 - House an account of their proceedings," and it was founded upon the general circumstances of things, the distress brought upon the public credit of the nation, and the general and loud complaints without doors. This motion, indeed, reasonable as it was, we know was opposed by...
Page 643 - When that affair was first moved in the House by Mr. Neville, he did not, he could not, charge the directors of that Company, or any of them, with any particular delinquencies : nor did he attempt to offer, or say that he was ready to offer, any particular proofs.
Page 142 - Float carelefs, lucid from their amber hue. A myrtle wreath, her rofy fingers frame, Which, from her hand, his polifh'd temples claim ; His temples fair, a ftreaking beauty ftains, As fmooth white marble fhines with azure veins.
Page 643 - Continent, are brought into the most imminent danger. This, sir, is admitted even by those who oppose this motion; and if they have ever lately conversed with those that dare speak their minds they must admit that the murmurs of the people against the conduct of the...
Page 643 - I ihall grant, and always ought to be the voice of the people : if new parliaments were more frequent, and few placemen, and no penfioners admitted, it would be fo ftill ; but, if long parliaments be continued, and a corrupt influence...

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