Discourses on Government, Volume 2

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Page 40 - Man's nature standing therefore as it doth, some kind of regiment the law of nature doth require; yet the kinds thereof being many, nature tieth not to any one, but leaveth the choice as a thing arbitrary." And again, " To live by one man's will, became all men's
Page 41 - from. God, or else by authority derived at the first from their consent, upon whose persons they impose laws, it is no better than mere tyranny. Laws therefore they are not, which public
Page 57 - gathered the Levites out of all the cities of Judah, and the chief of the fathers of Israel, and they came to Jerusalem : and all the congregation made a covenant with the king in the house of God, and
Page 40 - of one kind have caused sundry others to be devised. So that in a word, all public regiment, of what kind soever, seemeth evidently to have risen from deliberate advice, consultation, and composition between men, judging it convenient and
Page 332 - Blake in FolestonBay, the Parliament had not above thirteen ships against three-score, and not a man that had ever seen any other fight at sea, than between a merchant-ship and a pirate, to oppose the best captain in the world, attended with many others in valour and experience not much inferior to him.
Page 40 - That this is not the only regiment that hath been received in the world. The inconveniences of one kind have caused sundry others to be devised. So that in a word, all public regiment, of what kind soever, seemeth evidently to have risen from
Page 40 - God : because not having the natural superiority of fathers, their power must needs be usurped, and then unlawful; or if lawful, then either granted or consented unto by them over whom they exercise the same, or else given extraordinarily by God.
Page 302 - is thought to have destroyed nine parts in ten of the people of that province. Amongst other things it is remarkable, that when Philip the Second, of Spain, gave Sienna to the duke of Florence, his ambassador then at Rome sent him word, that he had given away more than six hundred and fifty thousand subjects ; and it is not believed there
Page 299 - most of them. It is ill, that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults, and wars; but it is worse, to bring nations to such misery, weakness, and baseness, as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for any thing; to have left nothing worth defending, and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Page 428 - king would do, he indeed instructs them what a subject must suffer: yet not so, that it is right for kings to do injury; but it is right for them to go unpunished by the people, if they do it; so that in this point it is all one whether Samuel describe a king, or a tyrant.

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