The East Anglian. To which is appended The history of Suffolk by T. Harral, W. Bethan and others

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Page 80 - Unhonour'd falls, unnoticed all his worth, Denied in heaven the soul he held on earth: While man, vain insect! hopes to be forgiven, And claims himself a sole exclusive heaven.
Page 76 - They gaze and marvel how - and still confess That thus it is, but why they cannot guess. Sun-burnt his cheek, his forehead high and pale The sable curls in wild profusion veil; And oft perforce his rising lip reveals The haughtier thought it curbs, but scarce conceals Though smooth his voice, and calm his general mien Still seems there something he would not have seen His features...
Page 76 - Saw more than marks the crowd of vulgar men; They gaze and marvel how - and still confess That thus it is, but why they cannot guess. Sun-burnt his cheek, his forehead high and pale The sable curls in wild profusion veil; And oft perforce his rising lip reveals...
Page 153 - Simplicius asks of her advice. Sudden she storms ! she raves ! you tip the wink; But spare your censure ; Silia does not drink. All eyes may see from what the change arose ; All eyes may see — a pimple on her nose. Papillia, wedded to her amorous spark, Sighs for the shades —
Page 76 - No dread of death if with us die our foes — Save that it seems even duller than repose : Come when it will — we snatch the life of life — When lost — what recks it by disease or strife...
Page 183 - Oh, who can tell, save he whose heart hath tried, And danced in triumph o'er the waters wide, The exulting sense - the pulse's maddening play, That thrills the wanderer of that trackless way?
Page 133 - ... upon principles of perfect reciprocity not inconsistent with the established maxims of public law, and with the maritime rights of the British empire.
Page 80 - But the poor dog, in life the firmest friend, The first to welcome, foremost to defend, Whose honest heart is still his master's own, Who labours, fights, lives, breathes for him alone...
Page 58 - I would sail with you under a flag of truce to any place you think safest from our cruisers, hauling it down when fair to begin hostilities. " You must, sir, be aware that my proposals are highly advantageous to you, as you cannot proceed to sea singly in the Chesapeake, without imminent risk of being crushed by the superior force of the numerous British squadrons which are now abroad, where all your efforts, in case of a rencontre, would, however gallant, be perfectly hopeless.
Page 96 - God and us, and to none other, for our honour and the surety of our person, only employ yourselves, and forthwith, upon receipt hereof, cause our right and title to the crown and government of this realm to be proclaimed in our city of London...

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