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A DIGEST OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR.

BY L. T. COVELL. 12mo. Price 50 Cents

This work, which is just published, is designed as a Text-Book for the use of Schools and Academies; it is the result of long experience, of an eminently successful Teacher, and will be found to possess many peculiar merits.

▲t a regular meeting of the Board of Education of Rochester, held June 18, 1858, the following resolution was unanimously adopted:

"Resolved, That Covell's Digest of English Grammar be substituted for Wells' Grammar, as a Text-Book in the public schools of this city, to take effect at the commencement of the next school year."

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Extract from the Minutes of a Regular Meeting of the Board of Education of Troy, May 31st, 1853.

"Mr. Jones, from Committee on text-books, and school librarias, moved, that BulHon's English Grammar be stricken from the list of text-books, and Covell's be substituted.-Passed."

From forty-four Teachers of Public Schools, Pittsburg, Pa.

"The undersigned have examined' Covell's Digest of English Grammar,' and are of opinion that in the justness of its general views, the excellence of its style, the brevity, accuracy, and perspicuity of its definitions and rules, the numerous examples and illustrations, the adaption of its synthetical exercises, the simplicity of its method of analysis, and in the plan of its arrangement, this work surpasses any other grammar now before the public; and that in all respects it is most admirably adapted to the use of schools and academies."

From all the Teachers of Public Schools the City of Alleghany, Pa.

We, the undersigned, Teschers of Alleghany city, having carefully examined Mr. Cell's Digest of English Grammar,' and impartially compared it with other gramme now in use, are fully satisfied that, while it is in no respect inferior to others, it is b, very many respects much superior. While it possesses all that is necessary for the advanced student, and much that is not found in other grammars, it is so simplified as to dapt it to the capacity of the youngest learner. We are confident that much time and abor will be saved, and greater improvement secured to our pupils in the study of this cience, by its introduction into our schools; nence we earnestly recommend to the Boarda ✔ Directors of this city, its adoption as a uniform text-book upon this science in the chools under their direction."

From JOHN J. WOLCOTT, A. M., Pr. and Supt. 9th Ward School, Pittsburg, Pa.

"Covell's Digest of English Grammar' not only evinces the most unceasing labor, the most extensive research, the most unrelaxing effort, and the most devoted self-sacrificing study of its author, but it is the most complete, the most perfect, and, to me, the most satisfactory exposition of English Grammar that has come to my notice. It appears to me that every youth aspiring to become master of the English languagɔ, from the rudimental principles to the full, round, beautiful, faultless, perfect period, will make this vol cane his vade mecum.'"

EXPOSITION OF THE GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE OF

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE.

BY JOHN MULLIGAN, A M.
Large 12mo.

574 pages. $1 50.

This work is a comprehensive and complete system o English Grammar, embracing not only all that has been developed by the later philologists, but also the results of years of study and research on the part of its author. One great advantage of this book is its admirable arrangement. Instead of proceeding at once to the dry details which are distasteful and discouraging to the pupil, Mr. M. commences by viewing the sentence as a whole, analyzing it into its proper parts, and exhibiting their conn onnection; and, after having thus parsed the sentence logically, proceeds to consider the individual words that compose it, in all their grammatical relations. This is the natural order; and expe rience proves that the arrangement here followed not only imparts additional interest to the subject, but gives the pupil a much clearer insight into it, and greatly facilitates his progress.

From DR. JAMES W. ALHYANDER,

"I thank you for the opportunity of perusing your work on the structure of the English language. It strikes me as being one of the most valuable contributions to this important branch of literature. The mode of investigation is so unlike what appears In our ordinary compilations, the reasoning is so sound, and the results are so satisfactory and so conformable to the genius and great aathorities of our mother tongue, that I propose to re ur to it again and again."

Extract from a letter from E. C. BENEDICT, Esq., President of the Board of Educa tion of the City of New York.

"I have often thought our language needed some work in which the principles of grammatical science and of the structure of the language, philosophically considered, were developed and applied to influence and control the weus and consuedo of Horace and Quintilian, which seem to me to have been too often the principal source of soledisms, irregularity and corruption. In this point of view, 1 consider your work a valuable and appropriate addition to the works on the language."

From WM. HORACE WEBSTER, President of the Free Academy, New York.

"The exposition of the grammatical structure of the English language by Professor Mulligan, of this city, is a work, in my opinion, of great merit, and well calonlated to Impart a thorough and critical knowledge of the grammar of the English language.

"No earnest English student can fail to profit by the stady of this treatise, yet it is designed more particulary for minds somewhat maturer, and for prpils who are onmabie and have a dostre, to comprehend the principles and learn the philosophy of the WI tongue."

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DICTIONARY OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

BY ALEXANDER REID, A. M.

12mo. 572 pages. Price $1 00.

This work, which is designed for schools, contains the PRONUNCIATION and Explanation of all English words authorized by eminent writers.

A Vocabulary of the roots of English words.

An Accented List of GREEK, LATIN, and SCRIPTURE proper names. An Appendix, showing the pronunciation of nearly 3,000 of the most important GEOGRAPHICAL names.

It is printed on fine paper, in clear type, strongly bound.

And is unquestionably one of the best dictionaries for the schoolroom extant.

From C. S. HENEY, Professor of Philsosophy, History, and Belles-Lettres, in the University of the City of New York.

"Reid's Dictionary of the English Language is an admirable book for the use of schools. Its plan combines a greater number of desirable conditions for such a work, than any with which I am acquainted; and it seems to me to be executed in general with great judgment, fidelity, and accuracy."

From HENRY REED, Professor of English Literature in the University of Pennsyl

vania.

"Reid's Dictionary of the English Language appears to have been compiled upon Bound principles, and with judgment and accuracy. It has the merit, too, of combining much more than is usually looked for in dictionaries of small size, and will, I believe, be found excellert as a convenient manual for general reference, and also for veriona purposes of education."

GRAHAM'S ENGLISH SYNONYMS,
CLASSIFIED AND EXPLAINED;

WITH PRACTICAL EXERCISES. DESIGNED FOR SCHOOLS AND PRIVATE TURION WITH AN INTRODUCTION AND ILLUSTRATIVE AUTHORITIES.

BY HENRY REED, LL. D.

1 Vol. 12mo. Price $1 00.

This is one of the best books published in the department of lan guage, and will do much to arrest the evil of making too eommon use of inappropriate words. The work is well arranged for classes, and can be made a branch of common school study.

It is admirably arranged. The Synonyms are treated with reference to their character, as generic and specific; as active and passive; an positive and negative; and as miscellaneous synonyms.

HAND-BOOK OF THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE.

BY G. R. LATHAM, M. D., F. R. S.

12mo. 400 pages. Price $1 25.

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This work is designed for the use of students in the University and High School

"His work is rigidiy cientific, and hence possesses a rare value. With the widespreading growth of the Aglo-Saxon dialect, the immense present and prospective power of those with whom this is their mother tongue,' such a treatise must be counted alike interesting and useful."- Watchman and Reflector.

"A work of great research, much learning, and to every thinking scholar it will be a Book of study. The Germanic origin of the English language, the affinities of the Eng. Ish with other languages, a sketch of the alphabet, a minute investigation of the etymo ogy of the language, &c., of great value to every philologist.”—Observer.

HISTORY OF ENGLISH LITERATURE.

BY WILLIAM SPALDING, A. M.

YROFESSOR OF LOGIC, RHETORIC, AND METAPHYSICS, IN THE UNIVERSITY OF ST. ANDREWS

12mo. 413 pages. Price $1 00.

The above work, which is just published, is offered as a Text-book for the use of advanced Schools and Academies. It traces the literary progress of the nation from its dawn in Anglo-Saxon times, down to the present day. Commencing at this early period, it is so constructed as to introduce the reader gradually and easily to studies of this kind. Comparatively little speculation is presented, and those literary monuments of the earlier dates, which were thought most worthy of atten tion, are described with considerable fulness and in an attractive manner. In the subsequent pages, more frequent and sustained efforts are made to arouse reflection, both by occasional remarks on the relations between intellectual culture and the other elements of society, and by hints as to the theoretical laws on which criticism should be founded. The characteristics of the most celebrated modern works are analyzed at considerable length.

The manner of the author is remarkably plain and interesting, almost compalling the reader to linger over his pages with unwearied Liteation.

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