Advanced Course of Composition and Rhetoric: A Series of Practical Lessons on the Origin, History, and Peculiarities of the English Language ...

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D. Appleton, 1857 - English language - 451 pages
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Contents

Amplification
329
Revision and Correction of Compositions
334
Exercise in Amplification LXXI Exercise in Amplification
336
Exercise on Plain and Figurative Language
337
Exercise in Extended Simile LXXIV Exercise in Extended Simile LXXV Exercise in Metaphorical Language
338
Exercise in Allegory LXXVII Exercise in Hyperboło
339
Exercises in Vision and Apostrophe LXXIX Exercise in Personification
341
PUTZ and Arnolds Manual of Ancient Geography and History 12mo
342
Parallels LXXXII Exercise in Parallels LXXXIII Exercise in Parallels
343
Exercise in Defining Synonymes LXXXV Exercise in Defining Synonymes LXXXVI Exercise in Paraphrasing LXXXVII Exercise in Paraphrasing
344
Exercise in Abridging LXXXIX Exercise in Abridging XC Exercise in Abridging
346
Exercise in Criticism
347
Description of Material Objects
348
Description of Natural Scenery and Persons
350
Narration Argument Exposition Speculation
353
Letters
355
PAGE
359
REIDS Dictionary of the English Language with Derivations c 12mo
363
Letters continued
365
Narratives
367
Exercise in Biography
372
Fiction
374
Essays
379
Exercises in EssayWriting CIII Theses or Argumentative Discourses
385
Orations SermonWriting
394
POETICAL COMPOSITION PART V
400
Stanzas Sonnets Heroic Verse Blank Verse
406
Rhymes Pauses
413
OVIII Varieties of Poetry
418
Specimen ProofSheet
424
Explanation of Marks used on the Specimen ProofSteet
426
List of Subjects
427
៩៩១ ន ន ន 52 67 74 79 81
428
100
429
262
430
847
431
480
432
Ancient History separate

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Page 195 - Hast thou given the horse strength? hast thou clothed his neck with thunder? Canst thou make him afraid as a grasshopper ? the glory of his nostrils is terrible. He paweth in the valley, and rejoiceth in his strength: he goeth on to meet the armed men. He mocketh at fear, and is not affrighted ; neither turneth he back from the sword.
Page 234 - And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud : for he is a god ; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked...
Page 270 - Reading maketh a full man; conference a ready man; and writing an exact man. And therefore, if a man write little, he had need have a great memory; if he confer little, he had need have a present wit; and if he read little, he had need have much cunning, to seem to know that he doth not. Histories make men wise; poets witty; the mathematics subtle; natural philosophy deep; moral grave; logic and rhetoric able to contend.
Page 252 - By foreign hands thy dying eyes were closed, By foreign hands thy decent limbs composed, By foreign hands thy humble grave adorned, By strangers honoured and by strangers mourned...
Page 210 - Before him went the pestilence, and burning coals went forth at his feet. He stood, and measured the earth: he beheld, and drove asunder the nations; and the everlasting mountains were scattered, the perpetual hills did bow: his ways are everlasting.
Page 224 - Under a shade, on flowers, much wondering where And what I was, whence thither brought, and how. Not distant far from thence a murmuring sound Of waters issued from a cave, and spread Into a liquid plain, then stood unmoved, Pure as the expanse of heaven ; I thither went With unexperienced thought, and laid me down On the green bank, to look into the clear Smooth lake, that to me seemed another sky...
Page 259 - I bridle in my struggling Muse with pain, That longs to launch into a nobler strain.
Page 306 - He, who still wanting, though he lives on theft, Steals much, spends little, yet has nothing left: And He, who now to sense, now nonsense leaning...
Page 253 - Lift up now thine eyes, and look from the place where thou art northward, and southward, and eastward, and westward : for all the land which thou seest, to thee will I give it, and to thy seed for ever.
Page 101 - The lip of truth shall be established for ever; but a lying tongue is but for a moment.

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