Kolonialpolitik

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C. L. Hirschfeld, 1905 - Colonies - 424 pages
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Excerpt from Kolonialpolitik

Endzweck der Kolonisation: Verbreitung der Zivilisation, Schöpfung neuer menschlicher Gesellschaften.

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Page 192 - It is a shameful and unblessed thing to take the scum of people and wicked condemned men, to be the people with whom you plant; and not only so, but it spoileth the plantation ; for they will ever live like rogues, and not fall to work, but be lazy, and do mischief, and spend victuals, and be quickly weary, and then certify over to their country to the discredit of the plantation.
Page 222 - By this we taste the spices of Arabia, yet never feel the scorching sun which brings them forth...
Page 227 - To prohibit a great people, however, from making all that they can of every part of their own produce, or from employing their , stock and industry in the way that they judge most advantageous i to themselves, is a manifest violation of the most sacred rights of \ mankind.
Page 46 - To propose that Great Britain should voluntarily give up all authority over her Colonies, and leave them to elect their own magistrates, to enact their own laws, and to make peace and war, as they might think proper, would be to propose such a measure as never was, and never will be adopted by any nation in the world.
Page 227 - In their present state of improvement, those prohibitions, perhaps, without cramping their industry, or restraining it from any employment to which it would have gone of its own accord, are only impertinent badges of slavery imposed upon them, without any sufficient reason, by the groundless jealousy of the merchants and manufacturers of the mother-country.
Page 222 - That no laws can set prices in trade, the rates of which must and will make themselves. But when such laws do happen to lay any hold, it is so much impediment to trade, and therefore prejudicial.
Page 237 - And that they shall, or lawfully may, establish and cause to be made a coin, to pass current there between the people of those several Colonies, for the more ease of traffic and bargaining between and amongst them and the natives there, of such metal and in such manner and form as the same several Councils there shall limit and appoint.
Page 224 - I shall therefore venture to acknowledge, that, not only as a man, but as a BRITISH subject, I pray for the flourishing commerce of GERMANY, SPAIN, ITALY, and even FRANCE itself. I am at least certain, that GREAT BRITAIN, and all those nations, would flourish more, did their sovereigns and ministers adopt such enlarged and benevolent sentiments towards each other.
Page 222 - That there can be no trade unprofitable to the public; for if any prove so, men leave it off; and wherever the traders thrive, the public, of which they are a part, thrives also.
Page 223 - ... the sooner, and that, in the end, he would greatly injure his own family by such whims ? And shall this nation commit an absurdity that stares every private man in the face? The certain way to be secure is to be more powerful, that is, to extend our trade as far as it is capable of; and as restraints have proved its ruin, to reject them, and depend on freedom for our security; bidding defiance to the French, or any nation in Europe, that took umbrage at our exerting our natural advantages.