A Grammar of the Hebrew Language

Front Cover
Gould, Newman & Saxton, 1839 - Hebrew language - 276 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

OCLC: 30572225
Related Subjects: Hebrew language -- Grammar.
LCCN:PJ

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 59 - And God made the firmament, and divided the waters which were under the firmament, from the waters which were above the firmament : and it was so. And God called the firmament Heaven. And the evening and the morning were the second day.
Page 57 - Hereby ye shall know that the living God is among you, and that He will without fail drive out from before you the Canaanites, and the Hittites, and the Hivites, and the Perizzites, and the Girgashites, and the Amorites, and the Jebusites.
Page xix - ... writings, in these historical references are so numerous, as well as so necessarily interwoven in their details, as to show at least about the time when they were written. The order in which they were written may be stated as follows, including what is denominated the golden age of the Hebrew : " The Pentateuch, Joshua, Judges, Samuel, Kings ; of the poetical, Job, the Psalms, the Proverbs ; and the older prophets in the following order — Jonah, Amos, Joel, Hosea, Micah, Isaiah, Nahum, Zephaniah,...
Page xv - In general, the roots are triliteral, and of two syllables. By far the greater part of the roots are verbs. (c) Pronouns, whether personal or adjective, are, in the oblique cases, united in the same word with the noun or verb to which they have a relation.
Page 265 - Massorets, as the inventors of this system were called, were the first who distinguished the books and sections of books into verses. They marked the number of all the verses of each book and section, and placed the amount at the end of each in numeral letters, or in some symbolical word formed out of them ; and they also marked the middle verse of each book. Further, they noted the verses where something was supposed to be forgotten ; the words which they believed to be changed ; the letters which...
Page 57 - ... xxi. 13, 26). In the genealogical table of Gen. x. "the Amorite" is given as the fourth son of Canaan. (vii) The Jebusites are uniformly placed last in the formula, by which the Promised Land is often designated. They were a mountain tribe, and occupied the strong fortress of Jebus (Jerusalem). the ark of the covenant, even the Lord of all the earth passeth over before you into Jordan.
Page 68 - Most of the letters have four forms in writing, depending on whether they occur at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of a word or whether they stand separately.
Page xv - Where two nouns come together, the latter of which is in the genitive, the first in most cases suffers a change, which indicates this state of relation ; while the latter noun remains unchanged ; that is, the governing noun suffers the change, and not the noun governed.
Page xxvi - ... what was ascertained by the same investigation, to be founded in the spirit of the language. In order to obtain a vivid apprehension and representation of the language in its true form, I have always investigated it by means of itself without knowing the opinion of former grammarians or assuming their correctness, and therefore it was necessarily indifferent to me, as to the results of my investigation!i, whether cny fact had been observed before or not ; I sought nothing old or new.
Page xv - Two nouns coming together, the latter of which is in the genitive, the first, in most cases, suffers a change which indicates this- state of relation, while the latter noun remains unchanged ; ie, the governing noun suffers the change...

Bibliographic information