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late in the afternoon, when the enemy ceased firing. Yesterday morning a flag of truce came in with one Major Read, who stated verbally that he had come by direction of General Hoke, to demand the surrender of the place, as they had possession of the Neuse River, the railroad, &c. I directed one of my aides-de-camp to go to Major Read and to say to him that his delicate jest was duly appreciated by me, but that he must leave in one-half hour, or we should fire upon him. He left immediately, and I have heard nothing from him since.

The forces on the railroad between this place and Morehead, I am told by two deserters, consisted of three brigades of Hoke, Corse, and Walker, all commanded by Walker, with some fifty or sixty pieces of artillery. I believe very little of what I hear, and although this information may be correct I doubt it—that is, I doubt if there was so large a force. Our artillery practice was excellent, and the deserters

, say that quite a number, something more than 40, were killed. Today I am having the railroad repaired, the telegraph wire replaced, &c., and before another day I hope to have our communication with Morehead open. I sent a steamer to Beaufort in the evening of the 5th. She has just returned, and I learn from Colonel Jourdan, commanding the Sub-District of Beaufort, that he is all right there, and that he will be able to hold out I firmly believe against any force that may attack him.

The inclosed copy of a letter from Captain Smith, senior naval officer, will explain the operations against the “ram” in the Albemarle Sound. Lieutenant King, of the Engineers, of my staff, witnessed the engagement with the ram, and I think it was a handsome affair. The Sassacus ran into the ram with all the force she could, but she could neither sink her nor roll her over. A shot went completely through the Sassacus, penetrating the boiler and killing 1 man, and scalding badly some 18 others.

The torpedoes are now in the mouth of the Roanoke River, and notwithstanding the formidable character of the ram I have no fears from her here. The rebel force that came here expected, I hear, to find the Roanoke ram here. I am confident of being able to hold everything here. The greatest difficulty I have to contend with is the trouble arising from the timid persons, women and children, and contrabands, who are badly scared. We have, however, I think, laughed the most of them out of their fears. Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

I. N. PALMER,

Brigadier-General. Maj. R. S. DAVIS,

A. A. G., Dept. of Va, and N. C., Fortress Monroe, Va.

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[Inclosure. *)

U. S. STEAMER MATTAPESETT,

Off Roanoke River, May 6, 1864. Brig. Gen. I. N. PALMER,

Commanding Land Forces in North Carolina: GENERAL : I have to inform you that I engaged the ram Albemarle yesterday from 4.40 to 7.30 p. m. with all my force, and regret that our efforts to capture her were not attended with success. Our

* See also report of the Secretary of the Navy for 1864, pp. 26-29.

shot had no perceptible effect upon her, close alongside. I drove her, however, into the mouth of Roanoke River, somewhat damaged, Í think, but with machinery not disabled. I captured the Bombshell, with 37 prisoners, officers and men. Have not as yet had any

official return from the Sassacus, who has her in charge, and is anchored several miles below. Our loss in the large vessel is 5 killed and 26 wounded. I shall be able to hold possession of the sound against any force the rebels can organize at this point. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

MELANCTON SMITH, Captain and Senior Naval Officer.

No. 2.
Report of Col. Henry T. Sisson, Fifth Rhode Island Heavy Artillery,

of the surrender at Croatan.
HDQRS. FIFTH REGIMENT RHODE ISLAND ARTILLERY,

New Berne, N. C., May 8, 1864. GENERAL: I have the honor to report the capture by the enemy of a portion of my regiment, and to submit the following particulars in relation to the matter:

During several months Company A has been stationed at Croatan, N. C. This place is situated on the line of the Atlantic and North Carolina Railroad, 12 miles south of New Berne, about half a mile east of Brice's Creek, and 6 miles from Havelock, which is the next station going south. Croatan is an isolated place and exceedingly difficult of access except by railroad, and has been held since the capture of New Berne simply to prevent guerrillas from tearing up the railroad track and cutting the telegraph wire. About 7 o'clock on

. the morning of the 5th instant the enemy, in considerable force, appeared at Croatan, having effected the crossing at Brice's Creek at a point above our pickets. Arriving at the station they immediately surrounded our men in preparation for an attack and to prevent the possibility of any escaping: In the mean time Captain Aigan collected his men and threw his entire command into the fort at that place, which has one small gun, a 6-pounder howitzer, and opened a vigorous fire on the enemy. A desperate fight ensued, lasting one hour and a half, when the enemy demanded an unconditional surrender. This was refused by Captain Aigan. Subsequently, however, seeing that he could maintain his position but a short time, he agreed to a conditional surrender, the terms of which I have not been able to ascertain. The citizens of Croatan affirm that the enemy freely acknowledged that our men fought with great gallantry. Fortunately, not one of Captain Aigan's command was killed and but i wounded. The loss of the enemy is not known. Captain White's horse was found dead in the ditch around the fort where he was shot. The men were allowed, as part of the terms of the surrender, to take two suits of clothing each, which will be of great service to them while they are held prisoners of war. About a week prior to their capture they received four months' pay from the Government. Nearly one-third of the men had re-enlisted as veterans, and had received the first installment of bounty, advance pay, &c. How large the force was that made this raid is not known. Citizens living at Croatan represent that it consisted of a whole brigade. It is a source

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of satisfaction to know that the men of the Fifth Regiment who participated in this affair fought bravely and well, and did all that soldiers could do against a foe so unequal in numbers.

Subjoined are the names of the officers and men who were taken prisoners of war, and are now in the hands of the enemy.* I am, sir, with respect, your obedient servant,

HENRY T. SISSON, Colonel, Comdg. Fifth Regt. Rhode Island Artillery. Brig. Gen. E. C. MAURAN,

Adjutant-General of Rhode Island.

MAY 4-JUNE 2, 1864.–Operations on the south side of the James River, Va.

SUMMARY OF THE PRINCIPAL EVENTS.+

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May 4,1864. -Advance of the Army of the James. 5–11, 1864.–Kautz's raid against the Petersburg and Weldon Railroad, in

cluding skirmishes at Birch Island Bridges, Blackwater River
(6th), Stony Creek Station (7th), and Jarratt's Station and

White's Bridge (8th).
6, 7, 1864.–Engagement at Port Walthall Junction and Chester Station.

7,1864. — Capture of U.S. gun-boat Shawsheen at Turkey Island.
9, 1864.–Engagement at Fort Clifton.

Skirmish at Ware Bottom Church,
Skirmish at Brandon (or Brander's) Bridge.

Engagement at Swift Creek, or Arrowfield Church.
10, 1864.-Destruction of Confederate torpedo station, James River, Va.

Action at Chester Station. 12–16, 1864.—Engagement at Proctor's Creek and Drewry's Bluff (or Fort Dar

ling). 12-17, 1864.–Kautz's raid against the Richmond and Danville Railroad, in

cluding skirmish at Flat Creek Bridge, near Chula Depot

(14th).
16, 1864,-Skirmish at Port Walthall Junction.
17-June 2, 1864.-Operations on the Bermuda Hundred front.
18, 1864.-Skirmish at Foster's Plantation.

Skirmish at City Point.
20, 1864.–Skirmish at Ware Bottom Church.
21, 1864.–Skirmish at Fort Powhatan.

REPORTS, ETC.

THE UNION ARMY.

No. 1.-Maj. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, U. S. Army, commanding Department

of Virginia and North Carolina, of operations May 4-20. No. 2.—Return of Casualties in the Union Forces commanded by Maj. Gen. Ben

jamin F. Butler, U.S. Army, May 5–31. * Nominal list shows that 3 officers and 49 enlisted men were captured.

+ Of some of the minor conflicts noted in this summary no circumstantial reports are on file; all such are designated in the Index.

See also references to these operations in Grant's report, Part I. For reports of naval co-operation see Annual Report of the Secretary of the Navy, December 5, 1864.

No. 3.—Return of Casualties in the Union Forces commanded by Maj. Gen. Ben

jamin F. Butler, U.S. Army, June 1-14. No. 4.-Capt. Lemuel B. Norton, U. S. Army, Chief Signal Officer, Department of

Virginia and North Carolina, including operations April 19-June 14. No. 5.- Capt. Gustavus S. Dana, Signal Corps, U. S. Army, including operations

April 17-June 19. No. 6.—Lieut. Sylvester B. Partridge, Signal Corps, U. S. Army, of operations

May 9. No. 7.-Lieut. Harvey W. Benson, Signal Corps, U. S. Army, of operations June

2-30. No. 8.–Lieut. Julius M. Swain, Signal Corps, U. S. Army, of operations May 1-31. No. 9.-Lieut. George F. Young, Fifth New York Heavy Artillery, Acting Signal

Officer, including operations May 6-June 27. No. 10.—Maj. Gen. Quincy A. Gillmore, U. S. Army, commanding Tenth Army

Corps, of operations May 4-25. No. 11.—Brig. Gen. Alfred H. Terry, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of

operations May 12–16. No. 12.—Col. Joshua B. Howell, Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania Infantry, commanding

First Brigade, of operations May 9–10. No. 13.-Capt. Leroy A. Baker, Thirty-ninth Illinois Infantry, of operations May

14-16. No. 14.-Capt. Robert P. Hughes, Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania Infantry, of operations

May 10. No. 15.—Col. Joseph R. Hawley, Seventh Connecticut Infantry, commanding Sec

ond Brigade, of operations May 9-June 2. No. 16.—Col. Redfield Duryee, Sixth Connecticut Infantry, of operations May 9–10. No. 17.—Lieut. Col. Daniel C. Rodman, Seventh Connecticut Infantry, of oper

ations May 9–14. No. 18.—Maj. Oliver S. Sanford, Seventh Connecticut Infantry, of operations May

10 and 16. No. 19.-Capt. Theodore Bacon, Seventh Connecticut Infantry, of operations June

1-2. No. 20.—Lieut. Col. Josiah I. Plimpton, Third New Hampshire Infantry, of oper

ations May 9-June 2. No. 21.

Lieut. Col. Thomas A. Henderson, Seventh New Hampshire Infantry, of

operations May 9–10. No. 22.—Col. Joseph C. Abbott, Seventh New Hampshire Infantry, of operations

May 12–16. No. 23.—Col. Harris M. Plaisted, Eleventh Maine Infantry, commanding Third Bri

gade, of operations May 7–10. No. 24.–Col. John L. Otis, Tenth Connecticut Infantry, of operations May 12–16. No. 25.—Lieut. Col. Winslow P. Spofford, Eleventh Maine Infantry, of operations

May 9–16. No. 26.—Col. Francis A. Osborn, Twenty-fourth Massachusetts Infantry, of oper

ations May 7–16. * No. 27.—Col. George B. Dandy, One hundredth New York Infantry, of operations

May 7 and June 1-2. No. 28.-Capt. Frank C. Brunck, One hundredth New York Infantry, of operations

May 14. No. 29.-Capt. Alfred P. Rockwell, First Connecticut Battery, of operations May

9-10. No. 30.—Capt. Zenas C. Warren, Fifth New Jersey Battery, of operations May 10. No. 31.—Capt. Loomis L. Langdon, Battery M, First U. S. Artillery, of operations

May 5–10.

No. 32.—Brig. Gen. John W. Turner, U. S. Army, commanding Second Division, of

operations May 12–16. No. 33.—Brig. Gen. John W. Turner, U. S. Army, of operations of the First Bri

gade May 9-10. No. 34.—Col. Samuel M. Alford, Third New York Infantry, commanding First

Brigade, of operations May 9-16. No. 35.—Col. Guy V. Henry, Fortieth Massachusetts Infantry, of operations May

12–16. No. 36.—Col. Harrison S. Fairchild, Eighty-ninth New York Infantry, of operations

May 9. No. 37.—Col. N. Martin Curtis, One hundred and forty-second New York Infan

try, of operations May 13–16. No. 38.—Col. William B. Barton, Forty-eighth New York Infantry, commanding

Second Brigade, of operations May 7–15. No. 39.—Lieut. John H. George, Fourth New Jersey Battery, of operations May 10. No. 40.—Col. Richard White, Fifty-fifth Pennsylvania Infantry, commanding First

Brigade, Third Division, of operations May 9-10. No. 41.–Lieut. Col. Henry Boynton, Eighth Maine Infantry, of operations May

9-10. No. 42.-Col. Jeremiah C. Drake, One hundred and twelfth New York Infantry,

commanding Second Brigade, of operations May 6–16. No. 43.—Col. Cyrus J. Dobbs, Thirteenth Indiana Infantry, of operations May 10. No. 44.—Capt. William H. Chaddock, One hundred and twelfth New York Infan

try, of operations May 4-16. No. 45.—Maj. Gen. William F. Smith, U.S. Army, commanding Eighteenth Army

Corps, of operations May 12–16. No. 46.-Surg. George Suckley, U. S. Army, Medical Director, of operations May

6–16. No. 47.—Capt. Preston C. F. West, Aide-de-Camp, of operations May 7. No. 48.—Lieut. Campbell Tucker, Aide-de-Camp, of operations May 12-16. No. 49.—James A. Scrymser, Volunteer Aide-de-Camp, of operations May 12-16. No. 50.—Brig. Gen. William T. H. Brooks, U. S. Army, commanding First Division,

of operations May 7–16. No. 51.-Col. Frederick F. Wead, Ninety-eighth New York Infantry, commanding

First Brigade, of operations May 12–16. No. 52.-Brig. Gen. Hiram Burnham, U. S. Army, commanding Second Brigade,

of operations May 7–16. No. 53.—Lieut. Col. Martin B. Smith, Eighth Connecticut Infantry, of operations

May 7–16. No. 54.—Col. Aaron F. Stevens, Thirteenth New Hampshire Infantry, of operations

May 7-16. No. 55.—Col. Horace T. Sanders, Nineteenth Wisconsin Infantry, commanding

Third Brigade, of operations May 12–16. No. 56.—Col. Arthur H. Dutton, Twenty-first Connecticut Infantry, commanding

Third Brigade, of operations May 16. No. 57.-Lieut. Col. Thomas F. Burpee, Twenty-first Connecticut Infantry, of op

erations May 15–16. No. 58.—Maj. Hiram B. Crosby, Twenty-first Connecticut Infantry, of operations

May 25–26. No. 59.—Maj. Theodore H. Schenck, Third New York Light Artillery, commanding

Artillery Brigade, of operations May 6–16. No. 60.—Capt. George B. Easterly, Fourth Wisconsin Battery, of operations May

7-21.

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