Shakespeare and the Hunt: A Cultural and Social Study

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 19, 2001 - Drama - 253 pages
Shakespeare and the Hunt is the first book-length study of Shakespeare’s works in relation to the culture of the hunt in Elizabethan and Jacobean society. The book explores topics generally unfamiliar to Shakespeareans, such as the variety of kinds of hunting in the period, the formal rituals of the hunt, the roles of Queen Elizabeth and King James as hunters, the practice of organized poaching, and the arguments both for and against hunting. Situating Shakespeare’s works in this rich cultural context, Berry illuminates the plays from fresh angles. He explores, for example, the role of poaching in The Merry Wives of Windsor; the paradox of pastoral hunting in As You Like It; the intertwining of hunting and politics in The Tempest; and the gendered language of falconry in The Taming of the Shrew.
 

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Great book; very informative about hunting in Shakespeare's time, with illuminating readings of individual plays.

Contents

I
III
37
IV
69
V
94
VI
132
VII
158
VIII
189
IX
208
X
225
XI
250
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About the author (2001)

Edward Berry is Professor of English at the University of Victoria, British Columbia.

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