The Blackest Bird: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York

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W. W. Norton & Company, Mar 17, 2007 - Fiction - 479 pages
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"Irresistibly seductive. Murder mystery, historical novel, portal to another time; The Blackest Bird is a masterpiece." —Anthony Bourdain

In the sweltering New York City summer of 1841, Mary Rogers, a popular counter girl at a tobacco shop in Manhattan, is found brutally ravaged in the shallows of the Hudson River. John Colt, scion of the firearm fortune, beats his publisher to death with a hatchet. And young Irish gang leader Tommy Coleman is accused of killing his daughter, his wife, and his wife's former lover. Charged with solving it all is High Constable Jacob Hays, the city's first detective. At the end of a long and distinguished career, Hays's investigation will ultimately span a decade, involving gang wars, grave robbers, and clues hidden in poems by the hopeless romantic and minstrel of the night: Edgar Allan Poe.

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THE BLACKEST BIRD: A Novel of Murder in Nineteenth-Century New York

User Review  - Kirkus

Two actual murders and a third fictional one collide with the dark world of Edgar Allen Poe in this uneven historical mystery by Rose (Kill Kill Faster Faster, 1997, etc.).New York City chief ... Read full review

Blackest bird: a novel of murder in nineteenth-century New York

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Writer Edgar Allen Poe has been the subject of-or at least a significant character in-quite a few historical mysteries recently, including Louis Bayard'sThe Pale Blue Eye , which places him at the ... Read full review

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About the author (2007)

Joel Rose is the author of Kill the Poor, Kill Kill Faster Faster, and New York Sawed in Half. He founded the literary magazine Between C&D and lives in New York City and on the Jersey shore.

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