Report Upon the Condition and Progress of the U.S. National Museum During the Year Ending June 30 ...

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1892
 

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Page 281 - I mean stock to remain in this country, to the United States of America, to found at Washington, under the name of the Smithsonian Institution, an establishment for the increase and diffusion of knowledge among men.
Page 492 - Now when chaos had begun to condense, but force and form were not yet manifest, and there was nought named, nought done, who could know its shape? Nevertheless Heaven and Earth first parted, and the three deities performed the commencement of creation; the passive and active Essences then developed, and the Two Spirits became the ancestors of all things.
Page 7 - States as ex-officio members, three members of the Senate, three members of the House of Representatives, and six citizens, two of whom shall be resident in the City of Washington and the other four shall be inhabitants of some state, but no two of them of the same state.
Page 301 - Congress shall have power to promote the progress of science and the useful arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries, and to make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for carrying into execution the foregoing powers.
Page 365 - That the President and Vice President of the United States, the Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of War, the Secretary of the Navy, the...
Page 289 - Discourse, on the objects and importance of the National Institution for the Promotion of Science, established at Washington, 1840, delivered at the first anniversary . Washington: P.
Page 3 - That, in proportion as suitable arrangements can be made for their reception, all objects of art and of foreign and curious research, and all objects of natural history, plants, and geological and mineralogical specimens, belonging or hereafter to belong, to the United States...
Page 327 - and others to the governors of States and to the diplomatic and consular representatives of the United States in foreign countries, announcing that they had been made corresponding members, and inviting their aid in the promotion of the objects of the Institution...
Page 297 - The influence of the National Institute upon the history of science in the United States, and particularly in educating public opinion and the judgment of Congress to an application of the proper means of disposing of the Smithsonian legacy, can not well be over-estimated. ' ' If the Smithsonian had been organized before the National Institute had exerted its influences, it would have been a school, an observatory, or an agricultural experiment station. "In 1846, however, the country was prepared...
Page 338 - But this would be equally objectionable ; since it would annually bring the Institution before Congress as a supplicant for government patronage, and ultimately subject it to political influence and control. After an experience of three years, I am fully convinced that the true policy of the Institution is to ask nothing from Congress except the safekeeping of its funds, to mingle its operations as little as possible with those of the general government, and to adhere in all cases to its own distinct...

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