Essex Institute Historical Collections, Volume 60

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Essex Institute Press, 1924 - Essex County (Mass.)
 

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Page 38 - Like unto ships far off at sea, Outward or homeward bound, are we. Before, behind, and all around, Floats and swings the horizon's bound, Seems at its distant rim to rise And climb the crystal wall of the skies, And then again to turn and sink, As if we could slide from its outer brink.
Page 120 - Prince told him that he had a crew of twelve men, every one of whom could take and work a lunar observation as well, for all practical purposes, as Sir Isaac Newton himself, were he alive.
Page 106 - I became then fearful, lest after some fighting, he would again make for the shore. To defeat this, I determined to keep full speed on, and with a port helm to run under the stern of the Alabama and rake her, if he did not prevent it by sheering and keeping his broadside to us. He adopted this mode as a preventive, and, as a consequence, the Alabama was forced with a full head of steam into a circular track during the engagement.
Page 111 - At the end of the engagement, it was discovered by those of our officers who went alongside of the enemy's ship, with the wounded, that her mid-ship section, on both sides, was thoroughly iron-coated ; this having been done with chains, constructed for the purpose, placed perpendicularly, from the rail to the water's edge, the whole covered over by a thin outer planking, which gave no indication of the armor beneath. This planking had been ripped off, in every direction, by our shot and "shell, the...
Page 110 - Some twenty minutes after my furnace fires had been extinguished, and the ship being on the point of settling, every man, in obedience to a previous order which had been given the crew, jumped overboard and endeavored to save himself. "There was no appearance of any boat coming to me from the enemy after my ship went down. Fortunately, however, the steam yacht Deerhound, owned by a gentleman of Lancashire, England, Mr.
Page 111 - About this time, the Kearsarge sent one, and then, tardily, another boat. Accompanying, you will find lists of the killed and wounded, and of those who were picked up by the Deerhound...
Page 114 - I could not believe that the commander of that vessel could be guilty of so disgraceful an act as taking our prisoners off, and therefore took no means to prevent it, but continued to keep our boats at work rescuing the men in the water. I am sorry to say that I was mistaken ; the Deerhound made off with Captain Semmes and others, and also the very officer who had come on board to surrender. " I learned subsequently that the Deerhound was a consort of the Alabama, and that she received on board all...
Page 111 - The enemy was heavier than myself, both in ship, battery, and crew; but I did not know until the action was over, that she was also ironclad. Our total loss in killed and wounded, is...
Page 101 - In general p. 336 the commission of a public ship, signed | by the proper authorities of the nation to which she belongs, is complete proof of her national character. A bill of sale is not necessary to be produced. Nor will the Courts of a foreign country inquire into the means by which the title to the property has been acquired.
Page 105 - ... of the enemy's commerce, which, at the beginning of the war, covered every sea. This is an achievement of which you may well be proud; -and a grateful country will not be unmindful of it. The name of your ship has...

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