The British Poets: Including Translations ...

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C. Whittingham, 1822 - Classical poetry
 

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Page 256 - They that go down to the sea in ships : and occupy their business in great waters; These men see the works of the Lord : and his wonders in the deep.
Page 261 - For ask now of the days that are past, which were before thee, since the day that God created man upon the earth, and ask from the one side of heaven unto the other, whether there hath been any such thing as this great thing is, or hath been heard like it? Did ever people hear the voice of God speaking out of the midst of the fire, as thou hast heard, and live?
Page 261 - ... continue in scarceness. 7 O God, when thou wentest forth before the people : when thou wentest through the wilderness, 8 The earth shook, and the heavens dropped at the presence of God : even as Sinai also was moved at the presence of God, who is the God of Israel.
Page 60 - THE angel ended, and in Adam's ear So charming left his voice, that he a while Thought him still speaking, still stood fixed to hear...
Page 278 - Besmear'd with smoke that nigh his eye-sight blent, With rugged beard and hoary shaggy heare, The which he never wont to comb, or comely shear. 35...
Page 115 - ... from hence your parting course you steer, Within a strait Cyanea's rocks appear. Arduous the task through these your way to keep, Unstay'd, unrooted, wand'ring in the deep. Ofttimes they rush, with front to front opposed, And clashing dreadful, both in one are closed.
Page 245 - What then is this bleating of the sheep in my ears, and the lowing of the oxen which I hear?" 15And Saul said, "They have brought them from the Amalekites; for the people spared the best of the sheep and the oxen, to sacrifice to the LORD your God; and the rest we have utterly destroyed.
Page 247 - Noah with a leaf of olive, nml brought the first tidings that the waters of the deep were assuaged, was held in many nations as particularly sacred: it was looked upon as a peculiar messenger of the Deity, an emblem of peace and good fortune. Among mariners it was thought to...
Page 246 - But we must remember that Argo passed, in her return, through Scylla and Charybdis, and that Apollonius, as well as Homer, has mentioned these rocks hy the name ur>.ayx7al, erratic, which is sup^ posed to be more strictly applicable to the Symplegades.
Page 247 - Among mariners it was thought to be particularly auspicious; who as th<y sailed, used to let a dove fly from their ships, to judge of the success of their voyage. The most favourable season for setting sail was at the Heliacal rising of the seven stars, near the head of Taurus ; and they are, in consequence of it, called Pleiades. It was at their appearance that the Argonauts sat out upon their expedition. *Af*o; J

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