Sporting Magazine: Or, Monthly Calendar of the Transactions of the Turf, the Chase and Every Other Diversion Interesting to the Man of Pleasure, Enterprize, and Spirit, Volume 11

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Rogerson & Tuxford, 1823 - Hunting
 

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Page 281 - By the will of the deceased it is expected that I should mention her, and say nothing but what is well of her. All that I shall say of her therefore is this: she was born well, she lived well, and she died well ; for she was born with the name Creswell, she lived in Clerkenwell, and she died in Bridewell.
Page 39 - MILLER, who was a tender Husband, a sincere Friend, a facetious Companion, and an excellent Comedian. He departed this Life the 15th day of August 1738, aged 54 years.
Page 39 - Could but esteem, and love preserve our breath, And guard us longer from the stroke of Death, The stroke of Death on him had later fell, Whom all mankind esteemed and loved so well.
Page 190 - If his appetite fails him, and does not return before shntting-up time that evening, he should have half a cordial, and half a diuretic ball, mixed together ; which, with a liberal allowance of tepid water, and an hour and a half walking exercise on the third day, will so far recover him, as to enable him to return to his former high feed on the fourth...
Page 223 - Tiger hunting is very fine amusement, so long as we hunt the tiger, but it is rather awkward when the tiger takes it into his head to hunt us.
Page 168 - ... and biting and tearing each other with the most ferocious rage, and trampling over those which were beaten down, till the shore, in the course of a quarter of an hour, was strewn with the dead and disabled. Part of them had been set free on a rising ground at...
Page 168 - A scene ensued such as probably never before was witnessed. The Spanish horses are not mutilated, and these were sensible that they were no longer under any restraint of human power. A general conflict ensued, in which, retaining the discipline...
Page 78 - Whoever takes up a newspaper in these eventful times it is even betting whether an accident by a coach or a suicide first meets his eye. Now really as the month of November is fast approaching, when from foggy weather and dark nights both these calamities are likely to increase, I merely suggest the propriety of any unfortunate gentleman resolved on self-destruction, trying to avoid the disgrace attached to it by first taking a few journeys by some of these Dreadnought, Highflyer, or Tally-ho coaches...
Page 146 - Let us therefore bestow a little time in endeavouring to discover why a warm, or what by many would be called a hot, stable is essential to the good condition of the horse. It is with all improvements upon old systems as with every infant science, we believe before we consider, and condemn before we investigate ; by which the simplest truths are too often disputed. In the first place, we must recollect that the horse is originally a native of a warm country ; and we need go no farther than the Scotch...
Page 3 - Corbet went abroad after having concluded his education, and returned to his native country a finished gentleman of the Old School. To the last year of his life he was remarkable for the neatness of his person and extremely gentleman-like appearance. His manners were peculiarly adapted to a man at the head of a pack of fox-hounds, being civil and obliging to the whole field, and particularly so to the farmers, by whom he was so much respected that the destruction of a fox by foul play was never heard...

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