A Practical Grammar of the English Language: For the Use of Schools of Every Grade

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Van Antwerp, Bragg & Company, 1868 - English language - 264 pages

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Page 248 - This it is and nothing more." Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer, " Sir," said I, "or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore; But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping, And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door, That I scarce was sure I heard you "—here I opened wide the door.
Page 178 - And everybody praised the Duke who this great fight did win." "But what good came of it at last?" quoth little Peterkin. "Why that I cannot tell," said he, "but 'twas a famous victory.
Page 55 - For we dare not make ourselves of the number, or compare ourselves with some that commend themselves : but they measuring themselves by themselves, and comparing themselves among themselves, are not wise.
Page 224 - So we were left galloping, Joris and I, Past Looz and past Tongres, no cloud in the sky; The broad sun above laughed a pitiless laugh, 'Neath our feet broke the brittle, bright stubble like chaff; Till over by Dalhem a dome-spire sprang white, And "Gallop," gasped Joris, "for Aix is in sight!
Page 65 - So shalt thou rest, and what if thou withdraw In silence from the living, and no friend Take note of thy departure? All that breathe Will share thy destiny. The gay will laugh When thou art gone, the solemn brood of care Plod on, and each one as before will chase His favorite phantom ; yet all these shall leave Their mirth and their employments, and shall come And make their bed with thee.
Page 219 - For behold this selfsame thing, that ye sorrowed after a godly sort, what carefulness it wrought in you, yea, what clearing of yourselves, yea, what indignation, yea, what fear, yea, what vehement desire, yea, what zeal, yea, what revenge ! In all things ye have approved yourselves to be clear in this matter.
Page 198 - Thus I consent, sir, to this Constitution, because I expect no better and because I am not sure that it is not the best.
Page 192 - It is the curse of kings to be attended By slaves that take their humors for a + warrant To break within the bloody house of life, And on the winking of authority, To understand a law, to know the meaning Of dangerous majesty, when, perchance, it frowns More upon humor than advised +respect.
Page 163 - It is gone, that sensibility of principle, that chastity of honour, which felt a stain like a wound, which inspired courage while it mitigated ferocity, which ennobled whatever it touched, and under which vice itself lost half its evil, by losing all its grossness.
Page 259 - I have found out a gift for my fair; I have found where the wood-pigeons breed; But let me that plunder forbear, She will say 'twas a barbarous deed...

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