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scapes of to-day and grand in its relics of that earlier age when the mammoth and rhinoceros browsed on its banks.

It has not been left to the writer of these pages to reveal for the first time the charms of Nature around London ; he well knows that the taste for rural pleasures is no new thing among Londoners, especially among holiday-makers of an humbler condition. But as the companion and occasionally the leader in rural excursions of some who have but recently come into possession of the Saturday Half-holiday, he sees Nature with something of the freshness and zest of his fellowramblers. To them the Saturday Half-holiday has come not as a matter of course, but as a coveted and long-deferred privilege, attained at length through persistent effort and after weary waiting. They now see a beauty, a vividness, and a wonder in Nature they never saw before, and to them these reminiscences and pictures of rambles enjoyed together will not appear exaggerated.

So far as these papers deserve it, may they be acceptable to the newer circle of lovers of Nature “in populous City pent” to whom they are now to be introduced. In the columns of a City journal friendly to the Saturday Half-holiday, they have already found a sympathetic public. May they be helpful in popularising still further the Saturday Half-holiday in the interest of thousands of Londoners who are still in grievous need of it.

H. W.

CONTENTS.

SATURDAY AFTERNOON RAMBLES.

No. I.

HORNSEY IN THE OLDEN TIME : ITS CLIMATE AND ZOOLOGY.

Spring.–Palm Season at Highgate.-Saturday Afternoon Symptoms in the

City.-A Rural Captive described by Wordsworth.-By Rail to Finsbury
Park.—Landscape Features of Middlesex.—Profiles of the Ground in the
Leafless Months.—Are the Hills Nature's tumuli?-An Excavation. The
Gates of Death : Friar Laurence on Mortality. The Geography, Zoology,
and Climate of the London Clay.-Crocodiles and their Companions.-
Professor Owen.—Mr. Prestwich.—A Septarium unearthed: its History.-
Hornsey submarine and Hornsey to-day.-Homeward Reflections.

LONDON PARK AND FOREST TREES,

June Invitations.— The Londoner's Saturday Afternoons.—Pursuits of the

Period.—Under the Willows.—The Trees of the Wood as Companions.-
From Ludgate Hill to St. James's Park ; Trees on the Route.-St. James's
Park Poplars, and their Varieties.-A Poet's Picture of the Willow, breeze-
lifted.—Lake Ornithology.—The Swan according to Southey.--List of the
Waterfowl to be seen at St. James's Park.–To Kensington Gardens.—The
Birch an Aboriginal of England.-A Sylvan Retreat.-An Alternative for
Bushey Park in the Chestnut Season.-The Horse Chestnut Tree : the

Blossom.-A Poet's Description. Etymology.of Horse Chestnut.--The
Charms of Tree Studies.

No. IV.

LONDON PARK AND FOREST TREES-—(continued.)

Landscape Scenery and Vegetation around London.—Travellers’ Opinions.-

The Author of “The Malay Archipelago.”—Defects of Tropical Scenery.-
Merits of the English rural Landscape ; Views from the Hills around
London.-The old Parks of London and their Trees.-Hyde Park: the
Scene.—Mr. Matthew Arnold's Lines.-Tree Study: the Aspen-poplar.-
The Aspen of the Poets verified.-Peculiarity of the Poplar Stalk.—Dr.
Hooker's Description.—The Poplar in the Hebrew Scriptures.—London
Poplars.-Kensington Gardens.—The Bridge.—Mr. Arnold again.—Jaques
“under melancholy boughs.”—Rural Sights and Sounds.- A leafy and
melodious Retreat from “ the huge world that roars hard by.”

No. V.

THE OLD SEA-BED IN MIDDLESEX.

A Return from the living Landscape to the subterranean World.-Nature's

Lithographs around London.-Finsbury Park again.—Extinction of Hornsey
Wood House: Relics.-Beautiful Landscape Prospect at Finsbury Park.—
Fossil Seeking: a Brickfield. On the Track of a Shark.-A Shark's Tooth.-
The Sharks of the London Clay.—The ancient Basins of London, Hamp-
shire, and Paris.- Area of the London Clay Sea.—Mr. Prestwich.-
Geography of Mount Pleasant (the Hog's Back), Hornsey.--The Contours
of an old World-Surface.-Nature's Architecture : her Broken Sky-lines.

SURREY : AUTUMN TOURS ROUND GODALMING.
The Autumnal Holiday Season.-Saturday Afternoon Ramblers abroad.

The Swiss Alps : Evidence of their Age.—Wild and beautiful Scenery
nearer Home: Where to find it.-Waterloo Bridge: Tourists of the Period,

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by the Author of the “Sentimental Journey."-Youthful Naturalists.

- By Rail to Godalming. - Surrey : its Landscape Scenery. - Hills
and Heaths.-Surrey Trees.--The Chestnuts of Salvator Rosa.-

Visit to
Hascombe Beeches. To the Burgate Chestnuts : Description of the Trees.

- To the Peperharrow Cedars.—To the Yews at Hambledon Churchyard.

--Tennyson's Lines.-Murray on the Yew Trees of Surrey Scenery.-

Review of Surrey Scenery.—The District of the Wey.-Wells and Springs

-Iron-stone : Local Manufacture.—The End of our Holiday.- Esau re.

turned from the Wilds.

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KNOCKHOLT BEECHES : A RAMBLE IN KENT.
A Manchester Naturalist on Landscape Scenery around London.-Autumn

in the Zone of deciduous Vegetation.—The Acadian Summer : Longfellow.
-M. Michelet on the Monotony of Perennial Foliage.--From London
Bridge to Knockholt.-Chelsfield Cutting.–Future Vestiges of Man.-
From Chelsfield to Knockholt.-Knockholt Beaches : Description.-Burn-
ham Beeches contrasted.—The Adonis of our Sylva.-Gilpin on the
Beech : Paris and Enone.—Great Beeches in England : Dr. Hooker.-
The Kentish Landscape : Distinctive Features of the Chalk Formation.-
The aged Earth.—The Geological Perspective.-A Vision of Ancient
Nature disturbed.–Fauns and Dryads of the Period.—Shades of Evening.

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No. X.

ELSTREE RESERVOIR : A SATURDAY AFTERNOON WITH “THE QUEKETT."

The Quekett Microscopical Club: its Work.-Field Excursionists of the

Period. — Elstree: its Geography. — By Rail from the City. - Hendon

Reservoir: a Suburban Fishery.–Middlesex Landscapes and the Chalk
Country.-Elstree Station.-Field-Naturalists on the Highway.-Hertford-
shire “Pudding-stones”: anciently used as “Querns."--Mr. Prestwich
quoted.-Elstree Village.-Landscape Views. - Elstree Reservoir. — The
Aborigines.--Herons at the Lake. -Pond-hunting : its Charms. --The
Quekett at Work.-A Malayan Traveller outdone. --Botany and Geography
of Elstree.-Rural Memories for Londoners.

BATTERSEA PARK: THE SUB-TROPICAL GARDEN.

Battersea Park in the Eyes of the Cognoscenti.-Saturday Afternoon Visitors.

-Love of the Poor for Flowers : Cowper.—The Sub-Tropical Garden :
an Oasis amid London Streets.-Route from the City.-General Aspect of
the Sub - Tropical Garden.- Huge-leaved Vegetation.— Contrasts: the
Northern Flora.-Minute Leaf-Embroidery.--The green Turf: Chaucer.
-Landscape Surroundings of the Sub-Tropicals.—The History of Bat-
tersea Park.–Battersea Fields transformed. --The Palm in an English
Greensward : Mrs. Hemans. - Old Geologic Times around London
restored.

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No. XIII.

A SATURDAY AFTERNOON IN KEW GARDENS.

City Botanists in the Seventeenth Century.-Gerarde, the Herbalist.-

Excursions from Apothecaries' Hall.–Kew Gardens and Modern Plant-
Hunters.—Saturday Afternoon Botanists to-day.-From St. Paul's to
Kew.-River Scenes and Discoveries.—At Kew Gardens.-Photographers
and Botanists.--Dr. Blimber's Young Gentlemen.-An Attempt to Lecture
in Kew Gardens, and what became of it. — Vegetable Biology. - The
Struggle for Existence among Plants: Dr. Hooker.-Cedars at Kew: C.
Libani, C. Atlantica, C. Deodara.Picea Pinsapo.-Kew Gardens as a Satur-
day Afternoon Resort.-A Botanical Menagerie. - The Marvel-Loving,
the Fashionable, the Student. The Soil of Kew Gardens.

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