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Thro' so immense a space so soon?
But now I thought myself i' th’moon;
And that a monster with huge whiskers,
More formidable than the Switzers,
My body thro' and thro’ had drillid,
And Whachum by my side had killid,
Had cross-examin'd both our hose,
And plunder'd all we had to lose ;
Look, there he is, I see him now,
And feel the place I am run thro':
And there lies. Whachum by my side,
Stone-dead, and in his own blood dy’d.
Oh! oh! with that he fetch'd a groan,
And fell again into a swoon ;
Shut both his eyes, and stopt his breath, 1145
And to the life out-acted death,
That Hudibras, to all appearing,
Believ'd him to be dead as herring.

1135

1140

VOL. I.

3. D

1150

1155

He held it now no longer safe,
To tarry the return of Ralph,
But rather leave him in the lurch :
Thought he, he has abus'd our church,
Refus'd to give himself one firk,
To carry on the public work ;
Despis’d our fynod-men like dirt,
And made their discipline his sport ;
Divulg'd the secrets of their classes,
And their conventions prov'd high places ;
Disparag‘d their tithe-pigs, as pagan,
And set at nought their cheese and bacon ;
Raild at their covenant, and jeer’d
Their rev'rend parsons, to my beard ;
For all which scandals, to be quit
At once, this juncture falls out fit.
I'll make him henceforth, to beware,

1165 And tempt my fury, if he dare :

1170

: 1175

He must, at least, hold up his hand,
By twelve freeholders to be scann'd.
Who, by their skill in palmistry,
Will quickly read his destiny,
And make him glad to read his leffon,
Or take a turn for 't at the session :
Unless his light and gifts prove truer
Than ever yet they did, I'm sure ;
For if he 'scape with whipping now,
'Tis more than he can hope to do:
And that will disengage my conscience
Of th'obligation, in his own sense :
I'll make him now by force abide,
What he by gentle means deny'd,
To give my honour satisfaction.
And right the brethren in the action.
This being refolv’d, with equal speed,
And conduct, he approach'd his steed,

1180

And with activity unwont,

1185
Assay'd the lofty beast to mount;
Which once atchiev'd, he spurr’d his palfry,
To get from th' enemy and Ralph free ;
Left danger, fears, and foes behind,
And beat, at least, three lengths, the wind.

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AN

HEROICAL EPISTLE

OF

HUDIBRAS TO SIDROPHEL.

Ecce iterum Crispinus.

5

;

Well, Sidrophel, tho' tis in vain
To tamper with your crazy brain,
Without trepanning of your scull,
As often as the moon 's at full,
'Tis not amiss, ere ye're giv'n o’er,
To try one desp'rate med’ine more
For where your case can be no worse,
The desp'rat'st is the wisest course.
Is't possible that you, whose ears
Are of the tribe of Islachar's.
And might, with equal reason, either
For merit, or extent of leather,

10

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