Herbals, Their Origin and Evolution: A Chapter in the History of Botany, 1470-1670

Front Cover
University Press, 1912 - Botanical literature - 253 pages
0 Reviews
Reviews aren't verified, but Google checks for and removes fake content when it's identified
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 108 - Doctor Priest, one of our London Colledge, hath (as I heard) translated the last edition of Dodonteus, which meant to publish the same ; but being prevented by death, his translation likewise perished.
Page 106 - Realmes, commonly used in Physicke. First set foorth in the Doutche or Almaigne tongue by that learned D. Rembert Dodoens, Physition to the Emperour : And nowe first translated out of French into English by Henry Lyte Esquyer.
Page 110 - ... and forme of a bird : when it is perfectly formed the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the aforesaid lace or string, next come the legs of the bird hanging out, and as it groweth greater it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come...
Page 112 - I took counsel of a certain man, whose upright conduct, often proved by me, had justified my trust, a theologian by profession and an Irishman by birth, Octavian by name, whether he thought Gyraldus worthy of belief in this affair. Who, taking oath upon the very Gospel which he taught, answered that what Gyraldus had reported of the generation of this bird was absolutely true, and that with his own eyes he had beholden young, as yet but rudely formed, and also handled them...
Page 72 - Lyte's translation, which will be discussed in a later section of this chapter. The last Dutch edition of the herbal, for which the author himself was responsible, was printed by Vanderloe in 1563. The publisher then parted with Fuchs...
Page 110 - ... when it is perfectly formed, the shell gapeth open, and the first thing that appeareth is the foresaid lace or string ; next come the legs of the bird hanging out, and as it groweth greater it openeth the shell by degrees, till at length it is all come forth and hangeth only by the bill. In short space after it cometh to full maturity, and falleth into the sea, where it gathereth feathers and groweth to a fowl, bigger than a mallard, and lesser than a goose...
Page 130 - ... footstalks, whereon do grow very faire and pleasant flowers, made of one entire whole leafe, which is folded or plaited in such strange sort, that it seemeth to be a flower made of sixe sundrie small leaves, which cannot easily be perceived except the same be pulled open.
Page 209 - God hath imprinted upon the Plants, Herbs, and Flowers, as it were in Hieroglyphicks, the very signature of their Vertues.
Page 208 - Wall-nuts have the perfect Signature of the Head: The outer husk or green Covering, represent the Pericranium, or outward skin of the skull, whereon the hair groweth, and therefore salt made of those husks or barks, are exceeding good for wounds in the head.
Page 208 - The kernel hath the very figure of the brain, and therefore it is very profitable for the brain and resists poysons; for if the kernel be bruised, and moystened with the quintessence of wine, and laid upon the crown of the head it comforts the brain and head mightily.

Bibliographic information