The History of Religion: Particularly of the Principal Denominations of Christians, ... Containing a Succinct and Genuine Account of Their Original and Present Constitution, Discipline, Doctrines, Worship, and Ceremonies: ... By an Impartial Hand

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C. Henderson; W. Nicoll; and J. Johnson, 1764
 

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Page 335 - If any man think himself to be a prophet, or spiritual, let him acknowledge that the things that I write unto you are the commandments of the Lord, 38 But if any man be ignorant, let him be ignorant.
Page 297 - God will not suffer us to be tempted above that which we are able to bear. No; whenever the gold is in the crucible, the Refiner himself is at hand ; and when a child of the Most High suffers, the paternal hand of Jehovah always lies, alleviating and mitigating, between the burden and the burdened shoulder.
Page 275 - I am come hither to suffer, and why the wicked do persecute this thy poor servant : not for my sins and transgressions committed against thee, but because I will not allow their wicked doings, to the contaminating of thy blood, and to the denial of the knowledge of thy truth, wherewith it did please thee by thy holy Spirit to instruct me : the which, with as much diligence as a poor wretch might (being thereto called), I have set forth to thy glory.
Page 437 - That the several constitutions and canons made and agreed to in the convocations or synods above mentioned, do contain in them many matters contrary to the king's prerogative, to the fundamental laws and statutes of this realm, to the rights of parliament, to the property and liberty of the subject, and matters tending to sedition, and of dangerous consequence.
Page 456 - ... according to the ancient and fundamental laws of this kingdom, the government is, and ought to be, by king, lords, and commons.
Page 296 - England, a pursuivant was sent to bring Bishop Latimer to London, of which he had notice six hours before he arrived. But instead of fleeing, he prepared for his journey to London ; and, when the pursuivant was come, he said to him, " My friend, you are welcome. I go as willingly to London, to give an account of my faith, as ever I went to any place in the world. And I doubt not, but as the Lord made me worthy formerly to preach the word before two excellent princes, he will now enable me to bear...
Page 284 - With that Master Bradford put off his cap, and lifting up his eyes to heaven, said, "I thank God for it; I have looked for the same a long time, and therefore it cometh not now to me suddenly, but as a thing waited for every day and hour; the Lord make me worthy thereof!
Page 269 - God, for his unmeasurable mercies plentifully poured upon us! And I, most unworthy wretch, cannot but pour forth at this present, even from the bottom of my heart, the bewailing of my great ingratitude and unkindness towards so gracious a God and loving a Lord.
Page 369 - If any learned man of all our adversaries, or if all the learned men that be alive, be able to bring any one sufficient sentence out of any old Catholic Doctor, or Father, or out of any old general Council, or out of the Holy Scriptures of God, or any one example of the primitive Church, whereby it may be clearly and plainly proved...
Page 278 - Stephen Gardiner, bishop of Winchester, and lord chancellor, and yet but a mortal man, I trow. But if I should be afraid of your lordly looks, why fear you not God, the Lord of us all? How dare...

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