The Tiger that Isn't: Seeing Through a World of Numbers

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Numbers have become the all-powerful language of public argument. Too often, that power is abused and the numbers bamboozle. This book shows how to see straight through them - and how to seize the power for yourself. Public spending, health risks, environmental disasters, who is rich, who is poor, Aids or war deaths, pensions, teenage offenders, the best and worst schools and hospitals, immigration - life comes in numbers. The trick to seeing through them is strikingly simple. It is to apply something everyone has - the lessons of their own experience. Using vivid and everyday images and ideas, this book shows how close to hand insight and understanding can be, and how we can all use what is familiar to make sense of what is baffling. It is also a revelation - of how little the principles are understood even by many who claim to know better. This book is written by the team who created and present the hugely popular BBC Radio 4 series, More or Less.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Thruston - LibraryThing

An essential guide to numerate thinking and how the media allow politicians and ad-men to con us. It covers the same ground as the BBC Radio 4 programme "More or Less" that was created by the authors ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - reading_fox - LibraryThing

Preaching to the converted. Only those already interested in the manipulation of numbers especially in the media are likely to read this - and for those this is very much an entry level popular guide ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
Make It Personal
6
Use Mushy Peas
23
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Michael Blastland was born in Glasgow. A journalist all his professional life, he started on weekly newspapers before moving to the BBC where he makes current affairs programmes for Radio 4, such as Analysis, More or Less and the historical series Why Did We Do That? He lives in Hertfordshire, often with his daughter Cait, less often and less quietly with his son Joe, when he's at home.

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